shake the dust from one's feet

shake the dust from (one's) feet

To forsake someone, something, or some place as an expression of rejection or as a means of seeking a new beginning. There comes a point in most people's lives when they feel get tired of their job and yearn to shake the dust from their feet. If you find that the people in your life are causing more negativity than positivity, it might be time to leave them behind and shake the dust from your feet.
See also: dust, feet, shake
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

shake the dust from one's feet

Depart in a hurry, especially from an unpleasant situation; also, leave forever. For example, I couldn't wait to shake the dust from my feet; I never wanted to see either of them again . This metaphoric term, alluding to moving one's feet fast enough to shake off dust, appears in several books of the Bible. [c. 1600]
See also: dust, feet, shake
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shake the dust from one's feet, to

To leave in a hurry, especially from a disagreeable situation; to depart forever. This term appears in several places in the Bible, in which Jesus is quoted as telling his disciples, “And whosoever shall not receive you, nor hear your words, when ye depart out of that house or city, shake off the dust of your feet” (Matthew 10:14; repeated in Mark 6:11; Luke 9:5). It remains current.
See also: dust, shake
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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