shade


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made in the shade

In a comfortable position in life, usually due to some manner of financial success or windfall. I can't believe they sold their company for billions—they're made in the shade now! If you're born into a wealthy family, you're made in the shade while the rest of us struggle.
See also: made, shade

shade

slang Subtle insults or expressions of disapproval. I was just checking my phone for a second when Joe totally threw shade at me, saying, "Some of us don't need to be glued to our phones every minute of the day." My mom is the queen of shade. She loves to say, "Is that really what you're going to wear?"

throw shade

slang To subtly issue insults or expressions of disapproval. I was just checking my phone for a second when Joe totally threw shade at me, saying, "Some of us don't need to be glued to our phones every minute of the day." My mom is the queen of throwing shade. She loves to say, "Is that really what you're going to wear?"
See also: shade, throw

put (one or something) in the shade

To make someone or something seem less interesting, important, or remarkable by comparison. I was really proud of my presentation, but Jonathan's put everyone else's in the shade. The fantastic performance by the Ugandan runner put his opponents in the shade.
See also: put, shade

shades of (someone or something)

A reminder, reminiscence, or approximation of someone or something in the past or another person or thing. She lined up the shot and got a perfect bull's-eye—shades of her former passion for marksmanship. He took a moment to collect himself after his outburst. "Shades of my father," he muttered to himself.
See also: of, shade

have it made in the shade

 and have got it made in the shade
Sl. to have succeeded; to be set for life. Wow, is he lucky! He has it made in the shade. Sarah's got it made in the shade with her huge inheritance.
See also: have, made, shade

shades of someone or something

Fig. reminders of someone or something; a thing that is reminiscent of someone or something. When I met Jim's mother, I thought "shades of Aunt Mary." "Shades of grade school," said Jack as the university lecturer rebuked him for being late.
See also: of, shade

shades of

A reminder of a person or situation in the past. For example, He really played a fine game for a fifty-year-old-shades of his high school triumphs, or They found themselves alone on the beach-shades of their childhood summers together. [Mid-1800s]
See also: of, shade

put someone/something in the shade

If one person or thing puts another in the shade, they are so impressive that they make the other person or thing seem unimportant or less good by comparison. Such was her beauty that even in her sixties, she managed to put younger women in the shade. The celebrations are so fantastic they would put Mardi Gras in the shade. Note: Shade here means the shadow or darkness produced by blocking the light.
See also: put, shade, something

shades of someone/something

If you have just mentioned a person or thing and you say shades of another person or thing, you mean that the first person or thing reminds you of the second one. MacDowell stars in a thriller as the wife of a criminal who has faked his death. Shades of The Third Man, perhaps? The debate was brought forward by a week, in an effort to prevent the protest planned for it by the students' leaders. Shades of 1968? Note: `Shade' is an old word for `ghost'.
See also: of, shade, something

in (or into) the shade

in (or into) a position of relative inferiority or obscurity.
See also: shade

a shade —

a little —. informal
1984 Armistead Maupin Babycakes Shall we go a shade lighter…Pink it up a bit?
See also: of, shade

shades of —

used to suggest reminiscence of or comparison with someone or something specified.
The sense of shade alluded to here is ‘shadow’ or ‘ghost’.
1991 Cordelia Mansall Discover Astrology Perhaps it is shades of the way your mother had to reject her own brilliance. You have a very fine brain which you tend to put down.
See also: of, shade

put somebody/something in the ˈshade

(informal) be much better or more successful than somebody/something: The new player really puts the rest of the team in the shade. OPPOSITE: cannot hold a candle to somebody/something

shade in

v.
1. To represent degrees of shade or shadow in some drawing or picture, so as to give the illusion of depth: The artist shaded in the contours of the model's face in the portrait.
2. To darken some bounded area that is drawn or printed on a surface: The teacher shaded in the area where the circles overlapped with yellow chalk. I'm going to shade in the left side of this drawing with crosshatches to make it darker.
See also: shade

shade into

v.
To pass from one quality, color, or thing to some other by very slight changes or degrees: The hues of the pink sunset shaded into purple.
See also: shade

have it made in the shade

tv. to have succeeded; to be set for life. (Have got can replace have.) Wow, is he lucky! He has it made in the shade.
See also: have, made, shade

shades

n. dark glasses. (see also sunshades.) Where are my shades? The sun is too bright.
See also: shade

a shade

A little bit; slightly: a sprinter who was a shade quicker that the rest.
See also: shade
References in classic literature ?
It was hot; and after walking some time over the gardens in a scattered, dispersed way, scarcely any three together, they insensibly followed one another to the delicious shade of a broad short avenue of limes, which stretching beyond the garden at an equal distance from the river, seemed the finish of the pleasure grounds.
The shade was most refreshing, and Emma found it the pleasantest part of the day.
Other shades now came down by the same way by which the door-shutters had gone up.
And again and again she made the circuit of the island, (while the sun rushed down to his slumbers), and at each issuing into the light there was more sorrow about her person, while it grew feebler and far fainter and more indistinct, and at each passage into the gloom there fell from her a darker shade, which became whelmed in a shadow more black.
That was the sort of reward Rose liked, the thanks that cheered her; and whenever she grew very tired, one look at the green shade, the curly head so restless on the pillow, and the poor groping hands, touched her tender heart and put new spirit into the weary voice.
You must, or I'll pull off this shade and stare at the sun as hard as ever I can stare.
He ceased, and heard their grant in loud acclaim; Then forthwith to him takes a chosen band Of Spirits likest to himself in guile, To be at hand and at his beck appear, If cause were to unfold some active scene Of various persons, each to know his part; Then to the desert takes with these his flight, Where still, from shade to shade, the Son of God, After forty days' fasting, had remained, Now hungering first, and to himself thus said:-- "Where will this end?
Asked for reasons, I had none to give and fancied I saw in her expression a shade of contempt for the vagaries of a jealous mind.
The same shade had before been observed at the bottom of an isolated enclosure, known by the name of Lichtenburg's circle, which is situated near the Hercynian mountains, on the borders of the moon; but they could not tell the nature of it.
If a Selenite were to shade his eyes from the sun's rays, the sky would seem absolutely black, and the stars would shine to him as on the darkest night.
The little winding paths, cool from the surrounding shade, led to the scattered houses; the owners of which everywhere gave us a cheerful and most hospitable reception.
A crown of woven cocoa-nut leaves is also worn as a shade for the eyes.
And meet it is, that over these sea-pastures, wide-rolling watery prairies and Potters' Fields of all four continents, the waves should rise and fall, and ebb and flow unceasingly; for here, millions of mixed shades and shadows, drowned dreams, somnambulisms, reveries; all that we call lives and souls, lie dreaming, dreaming, still; tossing like slumberers in their beds; the ever-rolling waves but made so by their restlessness.
The truth must have been that, all unversed in the arts of the wily Greek, the deceiver of gods, the lover of strange women, the evoker of bloodthirsty shades, I yet longed for the beginning of my own obscure Odyssey, which, as was proper for a modern, should unroll its wonders and terrors beyond the Pillars of Hercules.
The Distinguished Naturalist made no immediate reply, but later, as in the shades of night they journeyed through the desolate vastness of the Great Lone Land, he broke the silence: