shabby

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not bad

Better than average or expected; satisfactory. A: "How's your new schedule this semester?" B: "Not bad. I don't have any classes before 11 AM, so that's a win in my book!" I didn't think I'd like it, but sushi isn't bad!
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. Quite good. A: "Did you see Dan's new car?" B: "Yeah, not too shabby!"
2. Better than expected; not bad. A: "What did you think of the play?" B: "Not too shabby, actually."
See also: not, shabby

Not bad (at all).

 
1. [Someone or something is] quite satisfactory. Bill: How do you like your new teacher? Jane: Not bad. Bob: Is this pen okay? Bill: I guess. Yeah. Not bad.
2. [Someone or something is] really quite good. (The person or thing can be named, as in the examples.) John: How do you like that new car of yours? Mary: Not bad. Not bad at all. Tom: This one looks great to me. What do you think? Sue: It's not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

 
1. Inf. nice; well done. (With emphasis on shabby.) Is that your car? Not too shabby'.' That play was not too shabby.
2. Inf. very shabby; very poor indeed. (With emphasis on too. Sarcastic.) Did you see that shot she missed? Not too shabby! What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby

not bad

Also, not half bad; not so or too bad ; not too shabby. Fairly good, as in Not bad, said the conductor, but we need to play the scherzo again, or The movie wasn't half bad, but Jerry wanted to go home, or Our garden's not too bad this year, or How are things going?-Not too shabby. All of the terms involving bad, which imply that something is less bad than it might be, date from the mid-1700s. The last variant, using shabby in the sense of "inferior," is slang of the late 1900s.
See also: bad, not

not (so/too) ˈbad

(spoken) quite good: ‘How are you feeling today?’ ‘Not too bad, thanks.’Some of his recent books are really not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. mod. [with emphasis on shabby] nice; well done. Is that your car? Not too shabby!
2. mod. [with emphasis on too] very shabby; very poor indeed. (Sarcastic.) What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby
References in periodicals archive ?
Mark Holt, Waterloo We don't complain JUST over three years ago, we were visited by friends from Canada and though they had a great time in Liverpool, they all said how surprised they were at the shabbiness and urban decay they saw.
The garden has lost its shabbiness and 2016 should see an upturn in its demeanour.
13 -- Well, I can't really blame you if such a flash of shabbiness (there are exceptions, of course) is the first thing that came in your mind.
Take Gary Neville and Jamie Carragher, who on Sky's Monday Night Football have raised the bar of TV analysis to its highest-ever level in a sport where fans have rightly moaned for decades about its third-rate, over-chummy shabbiness.
Among the legitimate problems raised by planners and that cry out for resolution now rather than later is the general shabbiness of the area's built environment and the poor management of its open spaces.
That actually is not as bizarre as one might think, even if one takes into account Tunisia's current economic troubles and the whole 1970s/1980s era shabbiness of almost everything in downtown Tunis.
Shabbiness, raggedness and a lack of care surpassed quality.
The decrepitude and old-world shabbiness of the Jewish Center of Brighton Beach made it a curious choice to host Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman's meeting with South Brooklyn's numerous Soviet emigres last night.
Gillian Poulter and Douglas Baldwins chapter on Mona Wilson and the Canadian Red Cross is not only a testament to Wilson's unending work, but offers commentary on the social conditions of the city, citing the persistent poverty, the shabbiness of dwellings, and the absence of central heating in many homes, conditions that did not diminish the willingness of Newfoundlanders to extend their homes and city to foreigners.
When the presence of Galliard Homes in the background was finally revealed, though, it put an entirely different slant on the shabbiness inflicted on Wimbledon and its sister GRA tracks.
There is no doubt that the road has become scruffier in recent years with a general air of shabbiness, but surely millions could've been saved by the cash-strapped government if the road was widened in parts and re-surfaced.
"The machines read denomination of banknotes, degree of shabbiness and sort banknotes.
On a recent trip to Berlin I was somewhat taken aback by the relative shabbiness of the city's Schonefeld airport, which didn't seem to me to have anything like the facilities one would expect from the capital city of Europe's largest and most successful economy.
In the same way an image of anger, shabbiness and lack of culture is not a genuine reflection of Islam, neither is this image that seeks to portray them as second-class citizens.
Nor does Cartledge shrink from dissecting the "shabbiness in Hungarian politics during the inter-war period" (p.