shabby

(redirected from shabbily)
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not bad

Better than average or expected; satisfactory. A: "How's your new schedule this semester?" B: "Not bad. I don't have any classes before 11 AM, so that's a win in my book!" I didn't think I'd like it, but sushi isn't bad!
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. Quite good. A: "Did you see Dan's new car?" B: "Yeah, not too shabby!"
2. Better than expected; not bad. A: "What did you think of the play?" B: "Not too shabby, actually."
See also: not, shabby

Not bad (at all).

 
1. [Someone or something is] quite satisfactory. Bill: How do you like your new teacher? Jane: Not bad. Bob: Is this pen okay? Bill: I guess. Yeah. Not bad.
2. [Someone or something is] really quite good. (The person or thing can be named, as in the examples.) John: How do you like that new car of yours? Mary: Not bad. Not bad at all. Tom: This one looks great to me. What do you think? Sue: It's not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

 
1. Inf. nice; well done. (With emphasis on shabby.) Is that your car? Not too shabby'.' That play was not too shabby.
2. Inf. very shabby; very poor indeed. (With emphasis on too. Sarcastic.) Did you see that shot she missed? Not too shabby! What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby

not bad

Also, not half bad; not so or too bad ; not too shabby. Fairly good, as in Not bad, said the conductor, but we need to play the scherzo again, or The movie wasn't half bad, but Jerry wanted to go home, or Our garden's not too bad this year, or How are things going?-Not too shabby. All of the terms involving bad, which imply that something is less bad than it might be, date from the mid-1700s. The last variant, using shabby in the sense of "inferior," is slang of the late 1900s.
See also: bad, not

not (so/too) ˈbad

(spoken) quite good: ‘How are you feeling today?’ ‘Not too bad, thanks.’Some of his recent books are really not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. mod. [with emphasis on shabby] nice; well done. Is that your car? Not too shabby!
2. mod. [with emphasis on too] very shabby; very poor indeed. (Sarcastic.) What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby
References in periodicals archive ?
of w HFLb t"People are being treated shabbily. and deserve better RICHARD HYMAN RETAIL ANALYST ON NEW DEAL
He alleged he was shabbily treated, verbally abused and thrown out of the party chief's bungalow on Friday evening by Tej Pratap.
"They treated Bihar very shabbily. They did not allow Government of India to give any special status or assistance to Bihar in spite of the fact that most wealth, whether above ground or below it, went to Jharkhand," a news agency quoted Ahmed,as saying.
? AFTER the fuss made about kick-off times and whether Liverpool and Everton should play on Sunday to accommodate Chelsea's Champions League commitments, the Football Association have again treated the fans shabbily.
After all, it is Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs who have been most shabbily treated at Ibrox as private embarrassment turns into a public scandal.
No wonder the airline industry is in decline when passengers are treated so shabbily.
There is no doubt that for ages the working class have been exploited and misused, and they have been treated very badly and shabbily.
NO SMOKE, no fire, that was the message from Vijay Amritraj to the organisers of the Aircel Chennai Open after some heartless hacks had played up stories as to how the champion had been treated shabbily here on Saturday.
DUNDEE UNITED chairman Stephen Thompson claims the Tannadice club have been treated "shabbily" by the Scottish Football Association in their bid to recruit Craig Levein as Scotland manager.
For it's Queenie, shabbily dressed and badly educated, who snobbish Hortense thinks, might be seen as shaming company.
"I am speechless that a company with such strong ties to Tasmania can treat its workers and its contractors so shabbily," said TGFA chief executive Chris Oldfield.
One day the king notices that even though the boy is shabbily dressed, he is happy and smiling.
They felt they were treated shabbily when, having agreed to a request to play on a Sunday, they arrived at a sunny Broadfield Stadium only to be told a yard-wide stretch of the pitch was frozen and the match was off.
STUART TOLLAN (Telegraph, August 1) is being shabbily treated by the city's social services department on the care hours allocated to him; these should be increased, because with multiple sclerosis his condition can only get worse.
accustomed to abuse, fat and shabbily dressed, he has forgotten or not