shabby

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not bad

Better than average or expected; satisfactory. A: "How's your new schedule this semester?" B: "Not bad. I don't have any classes before 11 AM, so that's a win in my book!" I didn't think I'd like it, but sushi isn't bad!
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. Quite good. A: "Did you see Dan's new car?" B: "Yeah, not too shabby!"
2. Better than expected; not bad. A: "What did you think of the play?" B: "Not too shabby, actually."
See also: not, shabby

Not bad (at all).

 
1. [Someone or something is] quite satisfactory. Bill: How do you like your new teacher? Jane: Not bad. Bob: Is this pen okay? Bill: I guess. Yeah. Not bad.
2. [Someone or something is] really quite good. (The person or thing can be named, as in the examples.) John: How do you like that new car of yours? Mary: Not bad. Not bad at all. Tom: This one looks great to me. What do you think? Sue: It's not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

 
1. Inf. nice; well done. (With emphasis on shabby.) Is that your car? Not too shabby'.' That play was not too shabby.
2. Inf. very shabby; very poor indeed. (With emphasis on too. Sarcastic.) Did you see that shot she missed? Not too shabby! What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby

not bad

Also, not half bad; not so or too bad ; not too shabby. Fairly good, as in Not bad, said the conductor, but we need to play the scherzo again, or The movie wasn't half bad, but Jerry wanted to go home, or Our garden's not too bad this year, or How are things going?-Not too shabby. All of the terms involving bad, which imply that something is less bad than it might be, date from the mid-1700s. The last variant, using shabby in the sense of "inferior," is slang of the late 1900s.
See also: bad, not

not (so/too) ˈbad

(spoken) quite good: ‘How are you feeling today?’ ‘Not too bad, thanks.’Some of his recent books are really not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. mod. [with emphasis on shabby] nice; well done. Is that your car? Not too shabby!
2. mod. [with emphasis on too] very shabby; very poor indeed. (Sarcastic.) What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby
References in periodicals archive ?
and were humbled 3-0 in one of the shabbiest performances ever seen at the City Ground.
This is a key reason, "along with higher levels of social benefits in general, why even Copenhagen's shabbiest quarters don't feel nearly as dangerous or as desperate as American ghettos.
Rushdie is the intifada of the imagination." (34) The intellectual must engage in total criticism; he must be able to question internal and external structures of authority and coalescence: "One of the shabbiest of all intellectual gambits is to pontificate about abuses in someone else's culture and excuse exactly the same practices in one's own." (35) Since the publication of Midnight's Children, Rushdie's prose has raised serious questions about the limits of nationalism, imperialism, and religious obscurantism--be it Islamic, British, or Hindu.
Dixon captured the growing spirit of resistance to arbitrary rule when he claimed that the Canadian people were in the process of having "their rights and liberties stolen from them by the shabbiest pack of political jackals that ever harassed a civilized country." (53)
Even the shabbiest fantasy pulp novel contains strains of it" (Lawhead 169).
Spread across its front page was one of the shabbiest pieces of journalism in memory.
The feud between the Maidmans and the Dursts preserved one of the shabbiest buildings on 42nd street while the rest of the street saw extensive upgrades.
`Is it not pitiable to think of the years he spent in this monotonous place, without any society worth speaking of, with only the shabbiest collection of books, with hardly any interest in life except the sky, and the hills and the peasantry?'" (p.
I arrived at about six o'clock, the very worst time, I believe, to arrive anywhere, for at six o'clock all towns are at their shabbiest, and one can obtain no true idea of them, the shops having recently closed and the people not yet got out onto the streets.
This has been one of the shabbiest movie summers in memory--a stretch as desolate as a beach closed by the Board of Health.
Perhaps the shabbiest of the court's tactics was to announce that a partial-birth ban must contain an exception for the health of the mother.
As time goes on this virtue is apt to turn into the ugliest, cruelest, shabbiest of the vices.
We observe that in World So Wide Lewis attributed to one of his shabbiest characters, an old fake of a connoisseur, a remark that, according to the secretary, caused Lewis to lose his temper at luncheon on one of those two occasions at I Tatti; the remark was that civilization ended with the fall of the Bastille.
Indeed, it was one of the features of the politics and culture of the radical movement in the 1960s to rehabilitate some of the shabbiest reputations spawned by the Stalinism of the 1930s.
"Indeed," Melville writes, "many are the Nantucket ships in which you will see the skipper parading his quarter-deck with an elated grandeur not surpassed in any military navy; nay, extorting almost as much outward homage as if he wore the imperial purple, and not the shabbiest of pilot cloth.'(33) The novel suggests that Ahab demands observance of these minor customs for illegitimate reasons having to do with his diseased nature.