shabby

(redirected from shabbier)
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not bad

Better than average or expected; satisfactory. A: "How's your new schedule this semester?" B: "Not bad. I don't have any classes before 11 AM, so that's a win in my book!" I didn't think I'd like it, but sushi isn't bad!
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. Quite good. A: "Did you see Dan's new car?" B: "Yeah, not too shabby!"
2. Better than expected; not bad. A: "What did you think of the play?" B: "Not too shabby, actually."
See also: not, shabby

Not bad (at all).

 
1. [Someone or something is] quite satisfactory. Bill: How do you like your new teacher? Jane: Not bad. Bob: Is this pen okay? Bill: I guess. Yeah. Not bad.
2. [Someone or something is] really quite good. (The person or thing can be named, as in the examples.) John: How do you like that new car of yours? Mary: Not bad. Not bad at all. Tom: This one looks great to me. What do you think? Sue: It's not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

 
1. Inf. nice; well done. (With emphasis on shabby.) Is that your car? Not too shabby'.' That play was not too shabby.
2. Inf. very shabby; very poor indeed. (With emphasis on too. Sarcastic.) Did you see that shot she missed? Not too shabby! What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby

not bad

Also, not half bad; not so or too bad ; not too shabby. Fairly good, as in Not bad, said the conductor, but we need to play the scherzo again, or The movie wasn't half bad, but Jerry wanted to go home, or Our garden's not too bad this year, or How are things going?-Not too shabby. All of the terms involving bad, which imply that something is less bad than it might be, date from the mid-1700s. The last variant, using shabby in the sense of "inferior," is slang of the late 1900s.
See also: bad, not

not (so/too) ˈbad

(spoken) quite good: ‘How are you feeling today?’ ‘Not too bad, thanks.’Some of his recent books are really not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. mod. [with emphasis on shabby] nice; well done. Is that your car? Not too shabby!
2. mod. [with emphasis on too] very shabby; very poor indeed. (Sarcastic.) What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, they will make the places youcan afford look much shabbier in comparison.
Ghulam Shabbier focus on old buildings of Peshawar and a look at his paintings shows that he has an eye for detail.
Harris's comic debut novel features an arranged marriage between two young Orthodox Jews in London: 20-year-old Baruch Levy, the son of a wealthy landlord who, destined to train as a rabbi, would rather study at a university, and Chani Kaufman, 19, one of eight daughters from a shabbier home.
Today, Facebook highlights our bet- ter content to others and mutes our shabbier content.
The houses here were narrower than houses on the neighboring streets, and shabbier, and set closer to the road.
If proper brands do not show interest in these fashion weeks, I am afraid it soon going to be shabbier than what it is today.
The area became shabbier and drew a transient population, many of whom were addicted to drugs and alcohol.
Things like this can make your home look shabbier than it needs to, so going from room to room with a fresh eye and putting right the problems is time well spent.
THERE is no shabbier business in Cypriot politics than the horse-trading that goes on before the announcement of the members of the Council of Ministers by a new president.
Witnesses claimed to have spotted them at one of the shabbier casinos late the next morning, as they stood forlornly before a phalanx of one-armed, mechanical bandits, praying for a windfall.
Shabbier Nagel won R6.25 million earlier this year after his leg was amputated in 2004 when he went to Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Pretoria, for heart surgery.
Meanwhile, slightly shabbier, more provisional works filled the back room.
vacuous vet Danny his cartoon for finding a even shabbier dump Leopard's Den.
Byline: Mohammad Ishaq Khattak, Said Amin, Ghulam Shabbier and Sadiq ur Rehman
Shabby thought-wracked Stephan Dedalus with his Italian-sounding name is an idealised version of the even shabbier young Joyce, as lawyer Gavin Stevens is an idealised version of William Faulkner (formerly Falkner) or as Malcolm Lowry can be vaguely discerned behind the prepostrously disguised Sigbjorn Wilderness or William Plantagenet, that redoubtable trio of crashing bores in false beards.