sext

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sext

1. noun A sexually-explicit text message, often including a photo. I was mortified when my mom saw the sext my boyfriend had sent me.
2. verb To send someone such a message. I was mortified when my mom caught me sexting my boyfriend.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hinduja said though dishonest responses were removed from the findings, "it is possible that the frequency of sexting among middle schoolers and high schoolers across the United States may be underrepresented in our research."
According to Amy Beaufort, supervisor at NSPCC's Childline Cardiff branch, sexting can have serious consequences on a young person's mental heath.
According to the Amy Beaufort, supervisor at NSPCC's Childline Cardiff branch, sexting can have serious consequences on a young person's mental heath.
Should every report of sexting to school authorities necessarily involve law enforcement and CPS?
Developments in digital communication have implications for privacy, notably in terms of "tracking and monitoring," "aggregation and analysis," and, with particular relevance to sexting, "dissemination and publication" (Nissenbaum, 2010).
In my days, the height of sexting by telephone was standing in a smelly, red GPO box at the end of a four-pennies-inthe-slot conversation of mainly silence and heavy breathing, playing the you-putthe-phone-down-first game to prove your undying love, while the queue outside got bigger.
This year, LANDED has presented on the subject of sexting to S1 pupils at 14 North Lanarkshire high schools, including St Aidan's, Calderhead, Clyde Valley, Coltness, Brannock, Dalziel, Our Lady's, Taylor and Braidhurst.
"Some people might be doing it, but are not aware that it is sexting," explained LANDED sexual health development worker, Shannon Quammie, who stressed that if you are under 18, it's against the law for anyone to take or have a sexual photo of you - even if it is a selfie.
'Over one-third had experienced sexual risk led by Unwanted Sexting Received or Sent (30 per cent) which was above the global average by five points,' it said.
Lauren Reynolds from Newbridge College said sexting is getting out of control due to a lack of information for pupils.
Sexting includes sending sexually explicit (or sexually suggestive) text messages and photos, usually by cell phone.
Teens engage in sexting (i.e., sending nude or nearly nude images of oneself to others, or exchanging sexually explicit verbal messages via mobile devices) to enhance romantic relationships, gain attention, experiment with sexuality, show interest in potential romantic partners during the flirtation stage, or as a joke among friends (Lenhart, 2009; Ringrose, Gill, Livingstone, & Harvey, 2012; Walrave, Heirman, & Hallam, 2014).
CHILDREN as young as ten have been investigated by the police for 'sexting' activities, West Midlands Police have revealed.
The program includes an hour-long classroom lesson that explains the consequences for students who cyberbully, post inappropriate images and videos, and take part in sexting.