set to


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set to

1. adjective Prepared or ready to begin or undertake something. Is everyone set to eat? We have our legal team set to draw up contracts whenever you are ready.
2. verb To prepare or begin doing or undertaking something, especially with energy or enthusiasm. After the Christmas break, we set to drafting up a new plan for our next project. Sarah is setting to earn her law degree next year.
3. To begin fighting. The two dogs snarled at one another before setting two right there on the sidewalk. The two students were brought to the principal's office after they set to over an insult during recess.
See also: set

set to

to begin to fight; to attack or commence someone or something. The two boys set to almost as soon as they met each other. They set to and fought for about ten minutes, cursing and screaming.
See also: set

*set to do something

ready to do something. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) I'm all set to go. Are you ready? We are set to leave at a moment's notice.
See also: set

set to

1. Apply oneself, begin, work energetically, as in We set to revamping our policy on child care, or She set to studying for the bar exam. [Early 1400s]
2. Begin fighting, as in Both of them were furious, and they set to immediately. [First half of 1700s]
See also: set

set to

v.
1. To begin working energetically: After we selected the tree, I picked up the ax and set to. We set to cleaning up the mess after the party.
2. To begin fighting: With no hope of escape, I put up my fists and set to.
See also: set
References in periodicals archive ?
* Leslie Jane Pessemier's Les Chansons, set to Canteloube; Allegro Ballet of Houston (Southwest)
* Joe Istre's High Heel Blues, set to songs by Tuck and Patty; Twin City Ballet (Southwest)
Consider many runs of an experiment in which B is set to 2 and A is set to 3, which might produce the following results in which colors (G stands for green and R for red) at the detectors agree about 85 percent of the time: B2: GGGGRGRRRGGRGRRGGRR A3: GGRGRGRRGGGRGRRGRRR.
According to the Strong Baseball Principle, the light at detector A would have flashed green in the first run of this sequence even if detector B had been set to 4.
As you can see in the diagrams, we like to use the 1-4 set to get into the offense because of its early backdoor opportunities and because it enables us to create options against defensive overplays.
As you can see, the athlete utilized one 30-second continuation set to fulfill his goal reps for the set.