set (one) against (someone or something)

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set (one) against (someone or something)

To cause someone to oppose, dislike, or fight against someone or something. Can't you see that he's trying to set us against each other? The new manager started spreading rumors in the hope of setting the employees against the new policy.
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set something against someone or something

 
1. to place or lean something against someone or something. Dave set the chair against Fred and had to move it away. I set the rake against the side of the house.
2. to make someone hate or oppose someone or something. His second wife set him against his former in-laws. The Civil War set brother against brother.
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set against

Be or cause someone to be opposed to, as in Civil wars often set brother against brother, or The police chief's critics were set against his officers. [Late 1200s] Also see dead set against.
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set against

v.
1. To place something so that it is touching something on the side: I set my golf clubs against the car and opened the trunk.
2. To place something against some background: The author has set the love story against the backdrop of war. In the picture, the old church is set against the large, glass skyscrapers.
3. To place something in contrast to something else: The price seems like a bargain when you set it against real estate prices in larger cities.
4. To incite someone to oppose or resist someone or something: The civil war set families against one another. The bosses are set against the proposal, so I doubt it will go through.
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set against

Strongly opposed to: We are dead set against the idea.
See also: set