set off (for some place)

set off (for some place)

To depart for or begin traveling (to some place). Have an amazing time in Japan! When do you set off? I'm setting off for New York tomorrow to attend a business meeting.
See also: off, set

set someone off

 
1. Fig. to cause someone to become very angry; to ignite someone's anger. (Based on set something off {2}.) That kind of thing really sets me off ! Your rude behavior set off Mrs. Franklin.
2. Fig. to cause someone to start talking or lecturing about a particular subject. (Based on set something off .) When I mentioned high taxes it really set Walter off. He talked and talked. The subject set off my uncle, and he talked on endlessly.
See also: off, set

set something off

 
1. Lit. to ignite something, such as fireworks. The boys were setting firecrackers off all afternoon. They set off rocket after rocket.
2. Fig. to cause something to begin. The coach set the race off with a shot from the starting pistol. She set off the race with a whistle.
3. Fig. to make something distinct or outstanding. The lovely stonework sets the fireplace off quite nicely. The white hat really sets off Betsy's eyes.
See also: off, set

set off (for something)

to leave for something or some place. We set off for Springfield three hours late. It was afternoon before we could set off.
See also: off, set

set off

1. Give rise to, cause to occur, as in The acid set off a chemical reaction. [Early 1600s]
2. Cause to explode, as in They set off a bomb. [Late 1800s]
3. Distinguish, show to be different, contrast with, as in That black coat sets him off from the others in the picture, or Italics set this sentence off from the rest of the text. [Late 1500s]
4. Enhance, make more attractive, as in That color sets off her blonde hair. [Early 1600s]
5. Begin a journey, leave, as in When do you set off for Europe? [Second half of 1700s]
See also: off, set

set off

v.
1. To give rise to something; cause something to occur: The heat set off a chemical reaction. A branch fell on my car and set the alarm off.
2. To cause something to explode: At midnight, we set off a string of firecrackers. The terrorists were building a bomb and planned to set it off in the train station.
3. To make someone suddenly or demonstrably angry: The clerk's indifference finally set me off. The constant delays set off even the most patient passengers.
4. set off from To indicate someone or something as being different; distinguish someone or something: His strong features set him off from the crowd. Indented margins set off the quotation from the rest of the text.
5. To direct attention to something by contrast; accentuate something: The editor suggested that I set off the passage with italics. The artist set the photograph off with a black background.
6. To counterbalance, counteract, or compensate for something. Used chiefly in the passive: Our dismay at her leaving was set off by our knowing that she was happy.
7. To start on a journey: When do you set off for China? The soldier set off on a mission.
See also: off, set