serve (one's) time

(redirected from serve his time)

serve (one's) time

To spend the amount of time in jail as required by one's prison sentence. After serving his time, the assailant will be deported back to his home country. There's no need to harass him; he served his time and paid his debt to society.
See also: serve, time

serve time

To spend time in jail as part of a prison sentence. The CEO is now serving time for his role in defrauding thousands of customers. No way am I getting involved with your scheme; I've no interest in serving time again.
See also: serve, time

serve time

to spend a certain amount of time in jail. The criminal served ten years in jail. After the felon served his time, he was released from prison.
See also: serve, time

serve time

Undergo a prison sentence; also, work at a particular task, especially an undesirable one. For example, We couldn't hire him when we learned that he had served time for robbery, or I applied for a transfer after serving time in that chaotic department. [Late 1800s]
See also: serve, time
References in periodicals archive ?
An inmate should have an opportunity to serve his time, have productive activities and try to improve his life.
The prisoner had been sentenced to the state corrections department but was allowed, at a sheriffs discretion, to serve his time in a work release program at a county jail.
One of his attorneys said he was diabetic and had a heart condition, so likely would serve his time in a medical unit.
The hunt is completely unnecessary and exceedingly cruel,'' Vlasak told a Canadian reporter while waiting to serve his time.
Faoa, who applied for a work-furlough program by which he could attend school during the day and spend nights in jail, will likely serve his time after this season.
If the jury rules he was insane, he would serve his time in a psychiatric hospital with the possibility of release if doctors declare him cured.
He might be allowed to serve his time in a work furlough program in which prisoners are released for work during the day and locked up at night on the grounds of Camarillo Airport.
The umpires were unhappy that American League president Gene Budig had suspended Alomar for only five games and had ruled that the All-Star second baseman could serve his time at the beginning of next season.
Sentencing came two weeks too late for a Newbury Park teen-ager who must serve his time in state prison rather than in California Youth Authority custody for a 1994 drive-by shooting.