sepulchre

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a whited sepulcher

A person, group, place, or thing presented as being virtuous and morally upright on the outside, but being hypocritically corrupt, immoral, or evil on the inside. A sepulcher is a burial vault containing the corpse of the deceased. Originally taken from a line in Matthew 23:27 in the Bible. We hope with this report to unmask the whited sepulcher that is the current governing body of the sport, which has profited off of bribery, the exploitation of migrant laborers, and the coercion of those who would stand against them. It always amuses me the shock people express when these TV evangelicals are exposed to be white sepulchers.
See also: white

a whited sepulchre

a hypocrite; someone who is ostensibly virtuous but inwardly corrupt. literary
This expression comes from Matthew 23:27: ‘Woe unto you…for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of dead men's bones, and of all uncleanness’. A sepulchre is a room or monument, cut in rock or built of stone, in which a dead body is laid or buried.
See also: sepulchre, white
References in periodicals archive ?
Cengiz Isik said that the idea to place the sepulchres under protection came up during the recent visit of Turkish Minister of Culture and Tourism Ertugrul Gunay to the region.
In order to facilitate the protection of the sepulchres, we will implement the "1007 Program" of the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Dr.
The preliminary preparations for the sepulchres project have been completed.
Using nanotechnology at the sepulchres of Kaunos would be an important step for the protection of other cultural items.
But his objects seem born for the museum, and they have been practicing for years in Twombly's Italian homes, where they sit on old end tables or faux-marble capitals like nothing so much as those "whited sepulchres" of the Bible, "which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of dead men's bones." In the festival atmosphere common in today's museum, their effect is surprisingly radical: Twombly's objects stop the carnival and reveal a tomb.
Such evidence of competence in reading makes startling the breezy way Jones reads meaning into sonnets he considers central to his case: in Sonnet '68, the blameless word "antique" calls forth allusions to the cult of Adonis and identification of the young man with Thoth/Hermes; and the occurrence of "sepulchres" and "green summer" in the same sonnet proves that the poem refers to "an ancient religion that was practiced outdoors" (125-26).
In the old days, persons who spoke against evil but did nothing were called hypocrites, whited sepulchres. Today, they're called celebrities.