seizing


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seize (someone or something) with (something)

To use something to grab, grasp, or hold onto someone or something, especially intensely or with a lot of strength. The astronauts seized the detached cable with the robotic arm. The wrestler seized me from behind with his gigantic arms and flung me around the ring like a ragdoll.
See also: seize

seize on(to) (something)

1. Literally, to grab, grasp, or hold onto something intensely or with a lot of strength. He had a panic attack halfway up the ladder due to his fear of heights and seized on for dear life. The child seized onto her father's arm during the scary parts of the film.
2. By extension, to accept, adopt, or undertake something with great enthusiasm or zeal. The boss decided seized onto my idea of developing a smartphone app to accompany our newest product. You need to seize on opportunities like these before they pass you by.
3. To resort to some tactic or plan, as out of desperation or necessity. Jake seizes onto any reason he can think of to get out of doing his chores. You can't just seize on any old excuse and expect that to fly in this office.
See also: seize

seize out

1. obsolete To take quick, forcible possession of something. These banks are little more than crooks, hiking up interest rates and seizing out property from those unable to pay.
2. slang To twitch and convulse from or as from a seizure. I saw a girl on the sofa seizing out, so I called 911 straight away. He was so angry that his whole body started seizing out.
See also: out, seize

seize the day

To take the opportunity to do something at the present moment without worrying about the future. This is our time. Let's seize the day! We may never get a chance to do this again.
See also: seize

seize the moment

To take full advantage of life's opportunities whenever and wherever they present themselves; to live life to one's full potential. I've tried to get the most out of life by always seizing the moment. That's how I ended up living in Europe and fell in love with your father!
See also: moment, seize

seize the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to seize the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, seize

seize the opportunity (to do something)

To accept or pursue an opportunity (to do something) with alacrity or conviction. Mark complains about his teaching job a lot, but I knew if he were offered a tenured position in the school, he would seize the opportunity without hesitation. When our manager said she was leaving the company, I seized the opportunity to fill the vacancy. You should have been seizing the opportunity to move someplace new and exciting—instead, you decided to just stay in the same town you've always known.
See also: opportunity, seize

seize up

To come to a sudden, unexpected stop and become immovable. I was so dehydrated that my leg seized up in the middle of the hike. The machine keeps seizing up. Have you checked the oil levels recently?
See also: seize, up

seize upon (something)

1. Literally, to grab or hold onto something intensely or with a lot of strength. He had a panic attack halfway up the ladder due to his fear of heights and seized upon the rungs for dear life. The child seized upon her father's arm during the scary parts of the film.
2. By extension, to accept, adopt, or undertake something with great enthusiasm or zeal. The boss decided seized upon my idea of developing a smartphone app to accompany our newest product. You need to seize upon opportunities like these before they pass you by.
3. To resort to some tactic or plan, as out of desperation or necessity. Jake seizes upon any reason he can think of to get out of doing his chores. You can't just seize upon any old excuse and expect that to fly in this office.
See also: seize, upon
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

seize something up

to grab or take something. The crow seized the freshly hatched chick up and flew away. The huge bird seized up the tiny chick.
See also: seize, up

seize up

to freeze or halt; to grind suddenly to a stop. The engine seized up, and the car coasted to a stop. My knee seized up in the middle of a football game.
See also: seize, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

seize up

Come to a halt, as in The peace talks seized up and were not rescheduled. Originally, from about 1870 on, this term was applied to a machine of some kind that jammed or locked, owing to excessive heat or friction. Its figurative use dates from about 1950.
See also: seize, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

seize the day

If you seize the day, you do what you want straight away, without worrying about the future. I can't wait ten years. Life has taught me to seize the day, if not the hour. He knows he might never get another chance of soccer glory and is determined to seize the day. Note: This is a translation of the Latin phrase `carpe diem', which is also sometimes used.
See also: seize
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

seize the day

make the most of the present moment.
This expression is a translation of Latin carpe diem , originally a quotation from the Roman poet Horace.
See also: seize
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

seize up

v.
To fuse or stick together with another part and become unable to move normally, especially as a result of high pressure or temperature: The car's engine seized up due to a loss of oil.
See also: seize, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Attorney General must assure that the sharing will encourage further cooperation between the department seizing the assets and the sponsoring federal law enforcement agency.
A training agenda should include topics of mutual interest such as legal issues, investigative techniques, and the mechanics of seizing and disposing of assets.
Seizing agencies shall strictly comply with all applicable legal requirements governing seizure practice and procedure.
Truths are compossible because philosophy's seizing of them simultaneously designates them as truths.
LS: I would have thought that the strategic move of putting mathematics in the place of ontology would at last open the way to a philosophical seizing of the theoretical sciences, written in the same formal mathematical language and possessing an oblique, if not to say blind, relation to phenomena.
Customs Minister John Healey said: "Customs and police are now seizing pounds 1 million a week across the UK, two-thirds of which could not have been seized without the new powers.
Although the rectangular object turned out not to be explosives, a Federal district court ruled that the officers had two independent legal justifications for seizing the object.
In Ross, the court concluded that the fourth amendment required the officer to have probable cause to believe the matchbox contained contraband before seizing it.
One favored way of raking in money is searching suspected drug couriers and seizing any cash they're carrying, on the assumption that it's either proceeds from a sale or the bankroll for a buy.
4) Refrain from seizing items not listed in the warrant (unless there are independent, legal grounds for the seizure).
For example, in Illinois, 65 percent of the money goes to the seizing law enforcement agency, 25 percent goes to the prosecutor, and 10 percent goes to the State police, who administer the program.