seethe

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Related to seethed: Seether, tainted, exaltation

seethe with (something)

1. To churn or roil with an abundance of something. The water of the rushing river seethed with white froth. The huge pot of stew seethed with bubbles as it boiled uncontrollably.
2. To be filled or swarming with some large amount of people or things. The room was so seething with people that it started giving me a panic attack! I opened the lid of the trash can to find it seething with maggots and flies.
3. To be in a state of violent, implacable agitation or excitement due to some emotion. He came out of the meeting seething with anger at being humiliated by his boss like that. I sat staring at the math textbook, positively seething with frustration. The entire country has been seething with riots and protests for the last week.
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seethe with someone or something

to swarm or seem to "boil" with someone or something. The wedding reception was seething with guests and well-wishers. The room was just seething with flies and other flying creatures.
See also: seethe

seethe with something

[for someone] to be agitated with anger, hatred, scorn, disgust, etc. Laura was seething with rage as she entered the tax office. We were seething with disgust at the rude way they treated the people who had just moved in.
See also: seethe
References in periodicals archive ?
"Espousing in a Baylor publication a view that is so out of touch with traditional Christian teachings," he seethed in the next edition of The Baylor Lariat, "comes dangerously close to violating University policy."
As the political battle over global warming seethed in Washington, D.C., the southwestern and southeastern United States endured a withering drought and heat wave.
Our writers' workshop seethed with discussions about art and freedom, about the responsibility of the artist to make a better world.
Nothing justifies the venom that seethed from white Chicago.
He seethed when Mr Howard attacked his boss Gordon Brown's forecasts of economic growth and erupted when he quoted a report about falling reading standards.
"I need a drink," seethed our favourite media mogul.