security

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lull (one) into a false sense of security

To cause one to feel safe and secure in a situation that poses risks or dangers. Installing cameras at home lulled me into a false sense of security—our house still ended up getting robbed. A: "I can't believe you were able to unseat the valedictorian!" B: "I think three years of accolades lulled her into a false sense of security."
See also: false, lull, of, security, sense

security blanket

That which gives one a feeling of comfort, confidence, and safety. An allusion to the common practice of children to carry around blankets or stuffed animals to give them a feeling of safety. His beard had long been his form of security blanket—something he could hide behind, something he could change at will, something he could fiddle with when he felt nervous or uncomfortable. My father's financial status was like a security blanket. Whenever anything else in life was going wrong, he always took comfort in his wealth.
See also: blanket, security

security against (someone or something)

Protection from someone or something; that which ensures the safety of someone or something from something else. Our antivirus software offers you security against all manner of malicious cyber-threats. The prisoner offered to testify in exchange for security against prison time. The entrances and exits have all been fitted with deadbolts and cameras to provide security against intruders.
See also: security

lull someone into a false sense of security

Cliché to lead someone into believing that all is well before attacking or doing someone bad. We lulled the enemy into a false sense of security by pretending to retreat. Then we launched an attack. The boss lulled us into a false sense of security by saying that our jobs were safe and then let half the staff go.
See also: false, lull, of, security, sense

security against something

something that keeps something safe; something that protects; a protection. Insurance provides security against the financial losses owing to theft, loss, or damage. A good education is a security against unemployment.
See also: security

lull into

Deceive into trustfulness, as in The steadily rising market lulled investors into a false sense of security. The earliest recorded version of this term referred to wine: "Fitter indeed to bring and lull men asleep in the bed of security" (Philemon Holland, Pliny's Historie of the World, 1601. Today it still often appears with the phrase a false sense of security.
See also: lull

security blanket

Something that dispels anxiety, as in I always carry my appointments calendar; it's my security blanket. This colloquial term, dating from about 1960, was at first (and still is) used for the blanket or toy or other object held by a young child to reduce anxiety.
See also: blanket, security

a security blanket

A security blanket is something that makes you feel safer and more confident. Everybody has a personal security blanket — it could be a handbag, a piece of jewellery or, if you're a guy, a moustache or a beard. For most of us, the lists we make act as security blankets, telling us what to do and how long to spend doing it. Note: A young child's security blanket is a piece of cloth or clothing which the child holds and often chews in order to feel comforted.
See also: blanket, security
References in periodicals archive ?
The qualifying securities firm has a rating in one of the top three investment grade rating categories from a nationally recognized statistical rating organization; or
Although certain securities, such as Treasuries, are more liquid than others, assigning a different maximum maturity to different types of securities limits the portfolio manager's ability to purchase the most attractive securities on a relative value basis at a particular maturity point.
In order to qualify for the exemption from registration, the securities must be offered in a private transaction exclusively to defined classes of large institutions referred to in Rule 144A as "qualified institutional buyers," or "QIBs." The public policy underlying Rule 144A assumes that, because of their size and sophistication, QIBs do not need the protection of the registration requirements of the securities laws.
368(a)(2)(F)(ii) diversification exception because, after the transfers, more than 25% of the value of T's total assets are invested in the stock and securities of one issuer, W ($210/$800 = 26%), and more than 50% of the value of its total assets are invested in the stock and securities of five or fewer issuers ($491/$800 = 61%).
It requires the auditor to design procedures to obtain reasonable assurance of detecting misstatements of assertions about derivatives and securities that, when aggregated with misstatements of other assertions, could cause the financial statements taken as a whole to be materially misstated.
The Board has determined that, subject to the prudential framework of limitations established in previous decisions to address the potential for conflicts of interests, unsound banking practices, or other adverse effects, underwriting and dealing in bank-ineligible securities are so closely related to banking as to be a proper incident thereto within the meaning of section 4(c)(8) of the BHC Act.(5) The Board also has determined that underwriting and dealing in bank-ineligible securities is consistent with section 20 of the Glass-Steagall Act (12 U.S.C.
Under the gain limitation rule, therefore, the amount of securities treated as money would be reduced by this $9,000 to $21,000, reducing Chuck's gain on the distribution from $25,000 to $16,000.
In the traditional method of going public, a company typically engages an investment banking firm to underwrite its securities, accountants to audit its books, securities attorneys to draft the legal documents that disclose the pros and cons of the investment and effect the transfer of securities, and other experts as needed (for example, a petroleum engineer or geologist in an oil and gas offering).
Dealers in securities also must maintain an inventory of securities held for resale; see Regs.
[subsections] 335 and 24(7) ("bank-eligible securities"), engaging in investing and trading activities, and buying and selling bullion and related activities, in accordance with section 225.28(b)(8) of Regulation Y (12 C.F.R.
115, Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities, which covered equity securities with readily determinable fair values and all debt securities.
Are we risking the integrity of our securities markets?
354 generally provides that, in most tax-free reorganizations, no gain or loss is recognized to a shareholder on an exchange of stock for stock, or on an exchange of securities for stock or securities of the same or lesser principal amount.
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