secure against (someone or something)

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secure against (someone or something)

1. To put in place protections against some kind of risk, threat, or danger. The doors have been fitted with deadbolts and security cameras to secure against intruders. We help new business owners secure against all manner of financial pitfalls. The prime minister is trying to secure against a no-confidence vote in parliament.
2. To add protections to something in order to prevent or deter some kind of risk, threat, or danger. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "secure" and "against." We should secure the doors against the rioters outside. The military began cracking down on dissenters to secure its control of the country against rebellion. This program secures software against piracy.
See also: secure
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

secure something against (someone, something, or an animal)

 
1. to fasten something against the entry of someone, an animal, or something. Jane secured the doors and windows against the prowler who was roving around the neighborhood. You had better secure the henhouse against coyotes.
2. to obtain a legal order involving someone or something. I secured an injunction against Harry. If he bothers you again, he'll have to go into court to explain himself. We can't secure an injunction against this ruling.
See also: secure
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Hardening" refers to the process of fortifying a system against unknown threats, which the author says is just as important as securing against known threats with umpteen security patches.
Topics addressed include: globalization and the challenges of inclusion and climate change, prevention of threats and emergency responses, deterring and surviving civil conflicts, securing against natural disasters, and responding to the security threat of infectious diseases.
Insurance companies rely on reinsurance for a variety of purposes, including expanding capacity, stabilizing underwriting results, financing growth, securing against shock losses such as those arising from catastrophes, and shortening the time to run oft certain businesses, but primarily sharing exposure to large risks.