scrump


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scrump

1. old-fashioned To pilfer or steal (something) from an orchard, typically apples. Primarily heard in UK. I told you—if I caught you scrumping apples from Master Bishop's orchards again, I would have the bailiff take you away! I was so poor at one point that I only survived by scrumping apples as I traveled the countryside.
2. slang To have sex (with someone or each other). He garnered a bit of a reputation for himself with the way he's been scrumping all over town. There are rumors floating around that the boss is scrumping her new secretary.

scrump

(skrəmp)
tv. & in. to copulate [with] someone. (Usually objectionable.) The movie showed a scene of some woman scrumping her lover.
References in periodicals archive ?
So we scrumped apples and pears in Llandough where we once trawled the famous Blue Pond looking for the fabulous king newt that ruled there, rumoured to be the size of a saltwater crocodile though no-one ever saw it, let alone caught it.
AS a boy Trevor Thorne regularly scaled the walls of Embleton Hall to scrump an apple or two from its orchard.
We lived next-door-but-one to the Parkgate Hotel, which had an orchard at the front where I learned to climb trees and scrump with the boys.
'I don't really need to be near many shops or anything - being in the trade, I've got a pretty well-stocked kitchen and there will always be orchards along the way to scrump a bucket of plums, and later apples, blackberries.'
Alas, kids don't scrump apples nowadays: the rush of spiriting away manky fruit doesn't hold a candle to hot-wiring a vehicle.
Meanwhile, their brothers disappeared straight after breakfast, spent all day playing Tarzan or 'Forin Leejun' in the woods with breaks to scrump apples or try to capture stray horses, returning at dusk.
WHEN I was a child, I went with my brother and his friend into a neighbour's garden to scrump apples.
And had the right amount of little scrimps (scrumps, scraps - whatever you call them) at the bottom of the helping, too.
He said: "I hope that any chain of Oor Wullie cafes or restaurants will feature hand-guddled salmon and scrumped apple pie.
In the best traditions of English improvisation, they scrumped apples from suburban gardens where windfalls would otherwise rot on the ground, and produced a `cyder nouveau' that scooped prizes in its wake.