scrounge

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be on the scrounge (for something)

To be asking for something without intending to do or give anything in exchange. Primarily heard in UK. A: "Tommy's on the scrounge for money again." B: "That kid needs to get a job."
See also: on, scrounge

go on the scrounge (for something)

To begin asking for something without intending to do or give anything in exchange. Primarily heard in UK. A: "Tommy's gone on the scrounge for money again." B: "That kid needs to get a job."
See also: go, on, scrounge

scrounge around (for someone or something)

To search all around trying to locate someone or something suited to one's purpose. Stranded in the mountains until a search team came for us, we were forced to scrounge around for anything we could eat. Due to new immigration restrictions, the hotel industry along the east coast has been scrounging around for enough workers to handle their busy season. Our magazine scrounges around for the very best deals on state-of-the-art electronics and appliances.
See also: around, scrounge, someone

scrounge up

To locate someone or something after foraging or searching exhaustively. A noun or pronoun can be used between "scrounge" and "up." Due to new immigration restrictions, the hotel industry along the east coast has been struggling to scrounging up enough workers to handle their busy season. Even though a trip to the grocery store was long overdue, I was able to scrounge enough food up to make a decent dinner. My mother refuses to buy anything new unless she can scrounge up a coupon for it.
See also: scrounge, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

scrounge around (for someone or something)

Fig. to look around all over for someone or something. I scrounged around for Jamie, but she was nowhere to be found. I will try to scrounge around for a replacement part that will do the job.
See also: around, scrounge

scrounge someone or something up

Fig. to find someone or something somewhere; to dig someone or something up. I can't think of anyone just now, but I will scrounge someone up. They scrounged up an escort for Liz.
See also: scrounge, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

scrounge around

Forage about in an effort to obtain something at no cost, as in We scrounged around their kitchen looking for a snack. It derives from the dialectal scrunge, "steal." [Colloquial; c. 1900]
See also: around, scrounge

scrounge up

Find or round up something, as in I'll have to scrounge up another microphone for today's speaker. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
See also: scrounge, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

be/go on the ˈscrounge (for something)

(British English, informal, disapproving) ask somebody for money, food, etc. without doing any work for it or paying for it: She’s always on the scrounge for cigarettes. Why doesn’t she buy her own?
See also: go, on, scrounge
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

scrounge up

v.
To obtain something by or as if by begging, scavenging, or borrowing: The dog scrounged up a bone in the pile of trash. I didn't have any quarters for the washing machine, but I scrounged some up by looking under the cushions on the sofa.
See also: scrounge, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scrounge (around (for someone or something))

(skrɑʊndʒ...)
in. to look around for someone or something; to seek someone or something in every likely place. Ask John to scrounge around for a wrench.
See also: for, scrounge, someone

scrounge (around )

verb
See also: scrounge

scrounge someone or something up

tv. to get someone or something somehow. I scrounged a doctor up in the middle of the night.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I've scrounged empty 55-gallon steel drums, plastic barrels, tree chippings for landscaping, sheet metal by the ton, steel and iron by the tons, railroad ties, timber, lumber and a lot more.
104)." This casts an interesting light on a quote buried in the footnote, perhaps waiting to be scrounged. Says another chronicler of the empire, "All the dumpster divers I have known come to the point of trying to acquire everything they touch (p.
Templeton scrounged around the garbage dump looking for bits of paper with words on them for Charlotte the spider to weave into her web.
We believed it was urgently important to call Nairn's story to the attention of Congress, so we scrounged up enough money to publish it as a full-page ad in The Washington Post - the only way we could get the news into that great newspaper.
Summary: AJMAN -- She scrounged for food to feed her penury-stricken sponsor's family.
Note the old galvanized steel oil field pump house I scrounged for free to house my water well components.
But community council town clerk Paul Wilkins said: "He was regarded as a drunk who scrounged off the locals and outstayed his welcome."
He made a shock return to the island of Lewis this week to repay locals he scrounged money from to pay his fare home - and vowed to visit Taransay.
Binford, of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, holds that hominids scrounged from carcasses abandoned by carnivores and consumed more bone marrow than meat (SN:3/9/85, p.
Figure B: I scrounged a piece of 1/4" thick, 14" diameter pipe exactly the right width for two "tires" when cut in half.
Keith, 32, has scrounged every spare yard of soil from neighbours' gardens so he can nurture his favourite crop.
Even my half cement block was scrounged. I never tried baking bread in this thing, but I suppose it could be done.
We used scrounged lumber, metal roofing, rigid insulation board and tank.
Each one of us had something that he had scrounged from the alley (he learned well from the "career scrounger").