scrounge


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Related to scrounge: separately, subpar

be on the scrounge (for something)

To be asking for something without intending to do or give anything in exchange. Primarily heard in UK. A: "Tommy's on the scrounge for money again." B: "That kid needs to get a job."
See also: on, scrounge

go on the scrounge (for something)

To begin asking for something without intending to do or give anything in exchange. Primarily heard in UK. A: "Tommy's gone on the scrounge for money again." B: "That kid needs to get a job."
See also: go, on, scrounge

scrounge around (for someone or something)

To search all around trying to locate someone or something suited to one's purpose. Stranded in the mountains until a search team came for us, we were forced to scrounge around for anything we could eat. Due to new immigration restrictions, the hotel industry along the east coast has been scrounging around for enough workers to handle their busy season. Our magazine scrounges around for the very best deals on state-of-the-art electronics and appliances.
See also: around, scrounge, someone

scrounge up

To locate someone or something after foraging or searching exhaustively. A noun or pronoun can be used between "scrounge" and "up." Due to new immigration restrictions, the hotel industry along the east coast has been struggling to scrounging up enough workers to handle their busy season. Even though a trip to the grocery store was long overdue, I was able to scrounge enough food up to make a decent dinner. My mother refuses to buy anything new unless she can scrounge up a coupon for it.
See also: scrounge, up

scrounge around (for someone or something)

Fig. to look around all over for someone or something. I scrounged around for Jamie, but she was nowhere to be found. I will try to scrounge around for a replacement part that will do the job.
See also: around, scrounge

scrounge someone or something up

Fig. to find someone or something somewhere; to dig someone or something up. I can't think of anyone just now, but I will scrounge someone up. They scrounged up an escort for Liz.
See also: scrounge, up

scrounge around

Forage about in an effort to obtain something at no cost, as in We scrounged around their kitchen looking for a snack. It derives from the dialectal scrunge, "steal." [Colloquial; c. 1900]
See also: around, scrounge

scrounge up

Find or round up something, as in I'll have to scrounge up another microphone for today's speaker. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
See also: scrounge, up

be/go on the ˈscrounge (for something)

(British English, informal, disapproving) ask somebody for money, food, etc. without doing any work for it or paying for it: She’s always on the scrounge for cigarettes. Why doesn’t she buy her own?
See also: go, on, scrounge

scrounge up

v.
To obtain something by or as if by begging, scavenging, or borrowing: The dog scrounged up a bone in the pile of trash. I didn't have any quarters for the washing machine, but I scrounged some up by looking under the cushions on the sofa.
See also: scrounge, up

scrounge (around (for someone or something))

(skrɑʊndʒ...)
in. to look around for someone or something; to seek someone or something in every likely place. Ask John to scrounge around for a wrench.
See also: scrounge, someone

scrounge (around )

verb
See also: scrounge

scrounge someone or something up

tv. to get someone or something somehow. I scrounged a doctor up in the middle of the night.
References in periodicals archive ?
So Sir Mick was left to scrounge off his tour mates.
"We are a nation of givers and takers, but now after a night out on the town the takers can simply email their mates the money they've borrowed or owe for a pint and help reduce the size of the scrounge debt."
Scrounge a brake drum and axle shaft from a large car.
BRITISH Army chief Sir Mike Jackson insisted yesterday that his troops in the Gulf are ready for war, brushing aside claims that they are having to scrounge food and equipment from the Americans.
Virgin boss Richard Branson may be one of the richest men in Britain - but he had to scrounge money from his wife at a charity ball.
Since our budget is limited, it was necessary to snoop and scrounge for building materials.
But celebrities were shocked when they found there was no free bar - and Eddie had to scrounge pounds 20 off a friend to buy a drink.
Pupils in eight out of 10 schools face hardship as parents are forced to scrounge cash needed to heat and light classrooms and provide necessities.
You have to scrounge hard to complete the month with your bank account teetering on a triple-digit balance.
And under EO 79, each agency there is supposed to shell out, but they were scrounging around and there were only two volunteers, the DOF and the DENR, and so we have to scrounge also for funds.
They were scrounging around and there were only two volunteers--the DOF and the DENR--and so we have to scrounge also for funds.
It depicted the country's fight against terrorism and extremism to eliminate this scrounges from the society.
It depicted the country fight against terrorism and extremism to eliminate this scrounges from the society.
At 26 she scrounges enough off the state to fund her smoking, drinking and wild parties.
Grief-stricken by the loss of her family, Green puts thorns on her clothes and nails on her boots, and covers her skin with tattoos of black vines and black roses, renaming herself "Ash." She scrounges desolately in the woods for any food she can find, and it isn't until she takes in a ghostly white greyhound that her heart starts to open up again to others.