scrog

(redirected from scrogs)

scrog

1. slang To have sex (with someone or each other). I had a terrible suspicion that he'd been scrogging girls behind my back. Janet and I want to get to know each other a bit better before we start scrogging.
2. slang To use a kind of net or screen to train a cannabis plant to grow its buds at a horizontal level so as to maximize the amount of light each one receives. Derived from an abbreviation of the term "screen of green," the name for this growing method. You're going to end up with a lot of wasted plant if you don't scrog your weed when you're growing. Because I scrogged all my plants, it will be a pain if I have to move them out of the green house.

scrogging

slang A growing method in which the cannabis plant is suspended by a screen, wire, or net and trained to grow its buds at a horizontal level so as to maximize the amount of light each one receives. Derived from the term "scrog" (sometimes stylized as "Scrog," "ScroG, or "ScrOG"), an abbreviation of the phrase "screen of green." Scrogging helps yield as much weed as possible out of each cannabis plant you grow. I just don't have the patience for scrogging. I'd rather just let my plant grow and smoke whatever I can get from it.

scrog

(skrɔg)
tv. & in. to have sex; to copulate [with] someone. (Usually objectionable.) You know what! I think those people over in the corner are scrogging!
References in classic literature ?
It was a rough part, all hanging stone, and heather, and big scrogs of birchwood; and away at the far end towards Balachulish, little wee red soldiers were dipping up and down over hill and howe, and growing smaller every minute.
At this point we turn right past Swain Court, right, and opposite Acorn Close we turn left along the footpath that runs under the railway bridge before bending past High Scrogs Farm, right.
Further, one might question the value of a household survey in, for example, the Wadeye community (NT) where there is an average of 16 people per house (SCROGS 2011a, 9.5) and the 'household' is centred on different systems of kinship and relationality (Morphy 2007), or where an Indigenous language is the first language spoken at home and there is no Indigenous language interpreter (65 per cent of Indigenous people in the NT speak an Indigenous language at home: ABS 2011).
We know that Indigenous people living in remote areas are particularly disadvantaged in terms of social, economic and health measures (for example, over-crowded housing, greater hospitalisation rates) and are much less likely to be able to access services (SCROGS 2011b).