scream

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Related to screamed: shrieking, vociferation

drag (someone) kicking and screaming

To force someone to go somewhere or do something against their will, especially when they protest against it vehemently and/or at great length. I really thought Mike would be perfect for that job, but I had to drag him kicking and screaming into an interview for it. Every summer we drag our kids kicking and screaming to their grandparents' house in the countryside. The prime minister dragged the country kicking and screaming into the 21st century.
See also: and, drag, kick, scream

be dragged kicking and screaming

To be forced (to go somewhere or do something) with extreme reluctance, especially despite lengthy or vehement protests. I really thought Mike would be perfect for the job, but he had to be dragged kicking and screaming into an interview for it. When we were kids, we were dragged to our grandparents' boring old house kicking and screaming every summer for two weeks.
See also: and, drag, kick, scream

be no screaming hell

To be rather unremarkable or unimpressive. Primarily heard in Canada. My job may be no screaming hell, but I get a steady pay cheque every week and that's good enough for me right now. It was a pretty lame club. The music was mediocre, and the women there were no screaming hell.
See also: hell, scream

scream (something) from the rooftops

To share some news or information publicly and with as many people as possible. I was ready to scream from the rooftops that we'd be having a baby, but my wife wanted to wait for a while before we made the news public. I know you want to scream it from the rooftops that you came in first in your class, but you should think about how it might make the other students feel and have a bit of modesty about it.
See also: rooftop, scream

scream (one's) head off

To scream or yell very loudly and lengthily. Suzy screamed her head off when I told her she couldn't have an ice cream cone. The stadium was packed with fans screaming their heads off for the popular band. Don't bother listening to the crazies who stand on street corners and scream their heads off at passersby.
See also: head, off, scream

kicking and screaming

A phrase used to describe someone who has been forced (to go somewhere or do something) with extreme reluctance, especially despite lengthy or vehement protests. Often used in the phrase "dragged kicking and screaming." I really thought Mike would be perfect for the job, but he had to be dragged kicking and screaming into an interview for it. When we were kids, we were dragged kicking and screaming to our grandparents' boring old house every summer for two weeks.
See also: and, kick, scream

no screaming hell

Rather unremarkable or unimpressive. Primarily heard in Canada. My job may be no screaming hell, but I get a steady pay cheque every week and that's good enough for me right now. It was a pretty lame club. The music was mediocre, and the women there were no screaming hell.
See also: hell, scream

scream loudest

To draw attention to a particular cause or problem, typically by overshadowing others. So we get to freeze in here while that department moves to a better office, just because they screamed loudest about the heat not working in this part of the building.
See also: loud, scream

scream bloody murder

1. To scream or shout very loudly. Enid screamed bloody murder when she noticed the snake in the rocks next to her. Please stop screaming bloody murder across the house. If you want to talk, go to the same room.
2. To forcefully complain, especially loudly and/or in a public manner. When they refused to give me a refund, I screamed bloody murder until the manager came out. Our customers will scream bloody murder if we raise the prices again.
See also: bloody, murder, scream

scream blue murder

1. To scream or shout very loudly. Enid screamed blue murder when she noticed the snake in the rocks next to her. Please stop screaming blue murder across the house. If you want to talk, go to the same room.
2. To forcefully complain, especially loudly and/or in a public manner. When they refused to give me a refund, I screamed blue murder until the manager came out. Our customers will scream blue murder if we raise the prices again.
See also: blue, murder, scream

scream the place down

To scream very loudly. The phrase can refer to screaming that expresses both positive and negative emotions. You should have heard my toddler scream the place down when she dropped her ice cream. When the candidate took the stage on the final night of the convention, her supporters screamed the place down.
See also: down, place, scream

piercing scream

Fig. a very loud and shrill scream. Suddenly, there was a piercing scream from the next room. Bob heard Susan's piercing scream and ran to help her.
See also: scream

scream at someone or something

to yell or screech at someone or something. Why are you screaming at me? Go scream at the dog, not me!
See also: scream

scream bloody murder

 and yell bloody murder
Fig. to complain bitterly; to complain unduly. When we put him in an office without a window, he screamed bloody murder. There is something wrong next door. Everyone is yelling bloody murder.
See also: bloody, murder, scream

scream down (on someone or something)

Fig. [for something, such as birds or bombs] to dive down on someone or something, with a loud noise or very swiftly. The bombs screamed down on the helpless peasants. As the bombs screamed down, some people ran and some prayed.
See also: down, scream

scream for something

to yell or shriek for something. The teenage audience applauded and screamed for more. The children said they were screaming for ice cream.
See also: scream

scream someone down

to scream loudly at someone; to outscream someone. (Compare this with shout someone down.) The angry crowd screamed down the politician. They screamed her down and drove her from the platform.
See also: down, scream

scream something out

to say something in a very loud voice. She screamed his name out for everyone to hear. Liz screamed out the winner's name.
See also: out, scream

scream with something

to scream because of something, such as pain, anger, rage, etc. Frank screamed with pain when the car door closed on his fingers. The teacher screamed with rage when the student talked back.
See also: scream

so mad I could scream

very mad. I am just so mad I could scream! Why is he such a jerk? she makes me so mad I could scream.
See also: could, mad, scream

scream bloody murder

Angrily protest as loudly as possible, as in When Jimmy took her teddy bear, Lauren screamed bloody murder, or Residents are screaming bloody murder about the increase in property taxes. The scream here may be either literal (as in the first example) or figurative, which is also true of invoking murder as though one were in danger of being killed. Versions of this term, such as cry murder, date from the 1400s.
See also: bloody, murder, scream

drag someone kicking and screaming

COMMON If you drag someone kicking and screaming to a place or into a different state, you force them to go there or to change even though they are unwilling to do this. The minister was dragged kicking and screaming to the House yesterday. Stefan was the man who would drag North Yorkshire kicking and screaming into the twenty-first century. Note: Other verbs are sometimes used instead of drag. A reviewer had managed to sneak in to a preview last week but he was spotted by security and hauled out kicking and screaming.
See also: and, drag, kick, scream

scream blue murder

BRITISH, INFORMAL or

scream bloody murder

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
1. If someone screams blue murder, they complain a lot about something. Unions accept free accommodation and travel, yet they would scream blue murder if the same was received by politicians. `If the FBI was doing this, people would be screaming bloody murder,' says Richard Taylor, a security and privacy expert.
2. If someone screams blue murder, they scream and shout very loudly. She screamed blue murder as he came at her. She ran from the building, screaming bloody murder. Note: The expression `blue murder' is perhaps derived from the French oath `morbleu', which is a variation of `mort Dieu'. `Bleu' or blue is used in French as a euphemism for `Dieu' or God, so `morbleu' literally means `blue death'.
See also: blue, murder, scream

scream

1. n. someone or something very funny. (Usually a scream.) The joke Tom told was really a scream.
2. n. ice cream. (Collegiate.) How about a nice big dish of scream?

scream bloody murder

tv. to scream very loudly; to complain or protest loudly. She screams bloody murder every time I get near her.
See also: bloody, murder, scream

screaming fantods

and (howling) fantods
n. extreme anxiety; nervous hysteria. (Old. One might call this vintage literary mock colloquial, since it survives in the works of well-known writers and occasional literary use. The origin is unknown, but the Oxford English Dictionary lists Fantad with the same meaning, and cautiously suggests that is related to fantasy and similar words containing fan.) The afternoon’s excitement has left Lady Waddington with a case of the screaming fantods. The reviewer felt that any slang dictionary that excluded “fantods” was defective.
See also: fantod, scream

screaming-meemie

and screamie-meemie
n. a screaming child or adult. Oh, don’t be such a screaming-meemie!

screaming-meemies

and screaming-meamies
n. the willies—a mental breakdown. They sent Bart away with the screaming-meemies.

screaming-meamies

verb
References in classic literature ?
screamed another voice, old and cracked, as I-Gos, the ancient taxidermist, sprang from among the guests and reached the throne steps ahead of the foremost warriors.
Jimmie screamed in pain and tried to twist his shoulders out of the clasp of the huge arms.
The woman screamed and shook her fists before her husband's eyes.
screamed the King, clawing with his fingers at the egg, in a struggle to remove it.
The King was unable to flee because he could not see which way to run; so he stood still and howled and shouted and screamed in abject fear.
And as she apprehended the boy's life was in danger, she screamed ten times louder than before; and indeed Master Blifil himself now seconded her with all the vociferation in his power.
No wonder Miss Rachel was fascinated: no wonder her cousins screamed.
I was at my wit's end after one minute with motormouth Gillian McKeith as she screamed and screamed and screamed and screamed.
In the hospital he screamed and screamed and screamed.
But whenever Ramsey spotted a patrol car behind her or passed one on the street, she screamed at Newlands that he lied to her about keeping deputies away.
DALLAS -- Hundreds of kids screamed their way to nearly matching the world record for the loudest scream by a crowd during the WONKA Scream-Off at Six Flags Over Texas yesterday.
NEARLY 33,000 children have screamed their heads off at screenings of Monsters Inc in Coventry city centre over the past six weeks.
Who screamed out to a frivolous world on dark nights, who was terrified and all alone.
And she screamed along with the audience the first time she saw herself being stalked on the big screen.