scowl at (someone or something)

(redirected from scowling at)

scowl at (someone or something)

To contort one's face into an expression of anger, disdain, or disapproval at and because of someone or something. I always make a point of waving to my neighbor each morning, but all he ever does is scowl at me from his porch. The boss scowled at the financial reports for the most recent fiscal quarter.
See also: scowl
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

scowl at someone or something

to make a frown of disapproval or displeasure at someone or something. Why are you scowling at me? I didn't do anything wrong! Mary scowled at her noisy cat.
See also: scowl
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
SCOWLING at the rain in a mood as bad as the weather, Mr Pip could be the UK's moodiest moggy.
However, seeing that Mr and Mrs Gray don't speak Welsh, how did she know that these women were speaking Welsh and that they were scowling at her for speaking English?
I was then revolted to see England bowler Sajid Mahmood repeatedly firing his missile, stooping to collect the ball on its gentle return, shape to hurl the missile toward the batsman's end and then scowling at his opponent.
At one point he touches on "orthodoxy and orthopraxis," with moderns scowling at the first and emphasizing the importance of the second; i.e., of doing things right.
Then he wonders why the Light Of His Life is scowling at him over the cornflakes.
In other words, we need to make our city more unsightly, hope that it rains more and slope around scowling at everyone.
The chess players, in addition to appearing freakishly large, are scowling at each other.
To cap it all off there is a silent, grumpy old bloke sitting in a large chair resembling an egg, scowling at you whilst dressed in a massive coat with buffalos on it, and a deer stalker hat with ginger pubes protruding from the sides - his only utterances being a desperate need for Diet Coke.
True to the documentary-art format, these photographs seethe with an underlying psychological tension: at an army base, an Anglo soldier stands looking at his young son, who is dressed in military camouflage gear and scowling at the camera; a rabbi cuts the foreskin from a tiny baby's penis as two men, presumably the father and another male relative, look on and laugh ecstatically at this initiation ritual; a handsome African-American teenager in black-tie escorts his date in sparkling-white taffeta to a formal dance and, arms crossed defensively, looks coolly into the camera.