scorn

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Hell hath no fury like a (certain type of person) scorned

No one will have a greater wrath or vengeance than (this type of person) when they have been wronged. A hyperbolic and often humorous play on the phrase "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned," in which any person, demographic, or profession may be substituted for "woman." The university might think nothing of hiking up the cost of tuition, but we'll show them that Hell hath no fury like a broke college student scorned! The governor, after veering away from his party's core ideologies, is now discovering that Hell hath no fury like politicians scorned.
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, of, scorn, type

Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.

Prov. There is nothing as unpleasant as a woman who has been offended or whose love has not been returned. When Mary Ann discovered that George was not in love with her, George discovered that hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. Bill: I'm getting tired of going out with Mary; I think I'll tell her we're through. Fred: Be careful. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, you know.
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, scorn, woman

hold someone or something up to scorn

Fig. to single out someone or something for repudiation. The entire crowd held Randy up to scorn for his part in the riot. The disappointed fans held up the losing team to scorn.
See also: hold, scorn, up

hell has no fury like a woman scorned

No anger is worse than that of a jilted woman. For example, Nancy has nothing good to say about Tom-hell has no fury, you know. This term is a shortening of William Congreve's lines, "Heav'n has no rage, like love to hatred turn'd, nor Hell a fury like a woman scorn'd" ( The Mourning Bride, 1697). Similar lines appear in several plays of the same period. Today the proverb is often shortened even more, as in the example.
See also: fury, hell, like, scorn, woman

hell hath no fury like a woman scorned

mainly BRITISH
People say hell hath no fury like a woman scorned to suggest that women often react very angrily to things that upset them. Benjamin's attention shifts from Mrs Robinson to her daughter Elaine and hell hath no fury like an older woman scorned. Note: Journalists often use other words in this expression to make it appropriate to the subject which they are writing about. The golfer, having decided not to attend next week's International Open competition, has discovered that hell hath no fury like a sponsor spurned. Note: This expression is often used to refer to cases where a woman has an unfaithful partner and takes revenge. Note: This comes from William Congreve's `The Mourning Bride' (1697): `Heav'n has no rage, like love to hatred turn'd, Nor Hell a fury, like a woman scorn'd.'
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, scorn, woman

hell hath no fury like a woman scorned

a woman who has been rejected by a man can be ferociously angry and vindictive. proverb
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, scorn, woman

laugh someone or something to scorn

ridicule someone or something.
This is a biblical idiom: see, for example, Job 12:4: ‘I am as one mocked of his neighbour, who calleth upon God, and he answereth him: the just upright man is laughed to scorn’ or Matthew 9:24: ‘He said unto them, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed him to scorn.’
See also: laugh, scorn, something

heap/pour ˈscorn on somebody/something

speak about somebody/something in a way that shows that you do not respect them or have a good opinion of them: She poured scorn on his plans to get rich quickly.
References in classic literature ?
From five to seven every afternoon, scorning the attractions of the band outside and the generally festive air which pervaded the great tea rooms, he sat at the corner of the bar upon an article of furniture which resembled more than anything else an office stool, dividing his attention between desultory conversation with any other gentleman who might be indulging in a drink, and watching the billiards in which some of his compatriots were usually competing.
Good, as goodness might be measured in their particular class, hard-working for meagre wages and scorning the sale of self for easier ways, nervously desirous for some small pinch of happiness in the desert of existence, and facing a future that was a gamble between the ugliness of unending toil and the black pit of more terrible wretchedness, the way whereto being briefer though better paid.
And on them was laid an unenviable struggle: for she, even fair, swift-footed Atalanta, ran scorning the gifts of golden Aphrodite; but with him the race was for his life, either to find his doom, or to escape it.
The fact is, that he did find so much in the books he read, applicable to his own misfortunes, and did find himself in every respect so much like the heroes--because of course he is conscious of his own superiority, as we all are, and very naturally--that he took to scorning everything, and became a genius; and I am quite sure that he is, at this very present moment, writing another book.
She ranged herself passionately on her husband's side, scorning the mere idea of his guilt, and fought for him tooth and nail.
Then came attacks on particular panels, one of which at last gave way to the repeated kicks; but it broke inwards, and the broken pieces got jammed across (the door being lined with green baize), and couldn't easily be removed from outside: and the besieged, scorning further concealment, strengthened their defences by pressing the end of their sofa against the door.
This Toby has been stolen in youth from another gentleman, and fraudulently sold to the confiding hero, who having no guile himself has no suspicion that it lurks in others; but Toby, entertaining a grateful recollection of his old master, and scorning to attach himself to any new patrons, not only refuses to smoke a pipe at the bidding of Punch, but to mark his old fidelity more strongly, seizes him by the nose and wrings the same with violence, at which instance of canine attachment the spectators are deeply affected.
EMMERDALE (7pm ITV1) HELL hath no fury like a woman scorned - especially when it's her own auntie that's been doing the scorning.