scorn

(redirected from scorner)
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Related to scorner: scornful, contemptibly
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heap scorn on (one's) head

To speak about one with contempt, disdain, or disrespect. My mother always heaped scorn on my hapless father whenever he spoke up about anything. It's fine to offer criticisms of their ideas, but don't just heap scorn on them.
See also: head, heap, on, scorn

Hell has no fury like a (certain type of person) scorned

No one will have a greater wrath or vengeance than (this type of person) when they have been wronged. A hyperbolic and often humorous play on the phrase "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned," in which any person, demographic, or profession may be substituted for "woman." The university might think nothing of hiking up the cost of tuition, but we'll show them that Hell has no fury like a broke college student scorned! The governor, after veering away from his party's core ideologies, is now discovering that Hell has no fury like politicians scorned.
See also: fury, hell, like, no, of, scorn, type

hell hath no fury like a (certain type of person) scorned

No one will have a greater wrath or vengeance than (this type of person) when they have been wronged. A hyperbolic and often humorous play on the phrase "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned," in which any person, demographic, or profession may be substituted for "woman." The university might think nothing of hiking up the cost of tuition, but we'll show them that Hell hath no fury like a broke college student scorned! The governor, after veering away from his party's core ideologies, is now discovering that Hell hath no fury like politicians scorned.
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, no, of, scorn, type

hell hath no fury like a woman scorned

No one will have a greater wrath or vengeance than a woman when she has been wronged. Most men find out the hard way that hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, no, scorn, woman

hold (someone or something) up to scorn

To reject or deride someone or something. I know Gloria—she'll definitely hold you up to scorn if you go to her black-tie event in anything but a tux.
See also: hold, scorn, up

laugh (someone or something) to scorn

To mock or ridicule someone or something; to subject someone or something to scorn, derision, or contempt. The senator was laughed to scorn for his ignorance of pop culture. They just laughed my idea to scorn during the meeting.
See also: laugh, scorn

pour scorn on (one's) head

To speak about one with contempt, disdain, or disrespect. My mother always poured scorn on my hapless father whenever he spoke up about anything. It's fine to offer criticisms of their ideas, but don't just pour scorn on them.
See also: head, on, pour, scorn

Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.

Prov. There is nothing as unpleasant as a woman who has been offended or whose love has not been returned. When Mary Ann discovered that George was not in love with her, George discovered that hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. Bill: I'm getting tired of going out with Mary; I think I'll tell her we're through. Fred: Be careful. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, you know.
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, no, scorn, woman

hold someone or something up to scorn

Fig. to single out someone or something for repudiation. The entire crowd held Randy up to scorn for his part in the riot. The disappointed fans held up the losing team to scorn.
See also: hold, scorn, up

hell has no fury like a woman scorned

No anger is worse than that of a jilted woman. For example, Nancy has nothing good to say about Tom-hell has no fury, you know. This term is a shortening of William Congreve's lines, "Heav'n has no rage, like love to hatred turn'd, nor Hell a fury like a woman scorn'd" ( The Mourning Bride, 1697). Similar lines appear in several plays of the same period. Today the proverb is often shortened even more, as in the example.
See also: fury, hell, like, no, scorn, woman

hell hath no fury like a woman scorned

mainly BRITISH
People say hell hath no fury like a woman scorned to suggest that women often react very angrily to things that upset them. Benjamin's attention shifts from Mrs Robinson to her daughter Elaine and hell hath no fury like an older woman scorned. Note: Journalists often use other words in this expression to make it appropriate to the subject which they are writing about. The golfer, having decided not to attend next week's International Open competition, has discovered that hell hath no fury like a sponsor spurned. Note: This expression is often used to refer to cases where a woman has an unfaithful partner and takes revenge. Note: This comes from William Congreve's `The Mourning Bride' (1697): `Heav'n has no rage, like love to hatred turn'd, Nor Hell a fury, like a woman scorn'd.'
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, no, scorn, woman

hell hath no fury like a woman scorned

a woman who has been rejected by a man can be ferociously angry and vindictive. proverb
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, no, scorn, woman

laugh someone or something to scorn

ridicule someone or something.
This is a biblical idiom: see, for example, Job 12:4: ‘I am as one mocked of his neighbour, who calleth upon God, and he answereth him: the just upright man is laughed to scorn’ or Matthew 9:24: ‘He said unto them, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed him to scorn.’

heap/pour ˈscorn on somebody/something

speak about somebody/something in a way that shows that you do not respect them or have a good opinion of them: She poured scorn on his plans to get rich quickly.

hell has no fury like a woman scorned

Beware the anger of a woman rejected in love. The term is an adaptation of the closing lines from William Congreve’s play The Mourning Bride (1697): “Heav’n has no rage, like love to hatred turn’d, nor Hell a fury like a woman scorn’d.” Neither the idea nor the expression was original. At least three seventeenth-century plays had similar lines, including Colley Cibber’s “No fiend in hell can match the fury of a disappointed woman—scorned, slighted” (Love’s Last Shift, 1696), and the idea had been expressed by the Roman writers Propertius and Juvenal, by Chaucer, and by numerous others.
See also: fury, hell, like, no, scorn, woman
References in periodicals archive ?
If Youth seems suited to a chapel, the closely allied Hick Scorner seems even more so.
Pity complains in Hick Scorner that "Extorsyon is called lawe so god me spede / Worse was hyt ne[u]er" ([Biii.sup.r]), and in The World and the Child, Folly explains that he frequents Westminster because he is an avaricious lawyer: Manhode: Herke, felowe, why doost thou to Westmynster drawe?
There is here a hint of a way in which productions could shape a more troubling vision of the play in which Falstaff's contempt is the source for justification of the repeated tormentings he receives, an image of a harsher world in which the community bonds together to punish its scorner, perhaps more than the original crime might appear to warrant, leaving a sense that the exclusions through which Windsor constructs itself are not necessarily to be valued quite as highly as productions have tended to do.
He is a nonbeliever and a scorner of all religion, which he compares to believing in fairies at the bottom of your garden, and perceives as one of the root causes of intolerance, persecution, and war.
Let the army see me among your other spoils, and add to your other praises this, that you hold your scorner scorned, pointing the finger at me, despised slave.
And he admits that after a decade of being dubbed Little Jack Scorner, it was time for an image overhaul.
For another excellent example of gender studies brought to bear on earlier Tudor drama, see Eleanor Rycroft, 'Morality, Theatricality, and Masculinity in The Interlude of Youth and Hick Scorner', The Oxford Handbook of Tudor Drama, 465-81, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199566471.013.0028.
For Berbatov it was a chance to remind Fergie he is still around and last season's Premier League joint top scorer impressed as he blocked efforts from Tom Lees and Ross McCormack in quick succession from Robert Snodgrass's scorner during a bright opening by Leeds.
And Apemantus the professional scorner of men is like Jaques in needing an audience of antagonists against whom to proclaim his Cynic autonomy.
modern-spelling texts of Youth and Hick Scorner, (9) and Paula
The striker added his second goal just before the break from Kevin O'Connor' scorner and Brentford then wasted several other chances to add to their lead.
"We had corner after corner and Gabor has come up for a scorner and nearly scored from the first one and then stayed up for the second one.
For mockers and scorners, Leah's immediate reward here is that she has etched her name in gold.
The towering Palace Dome will feature scorners of festive activities to surround the Christmas trees, including a special seat for Santa Claus, and a Gingerbread house selling Christmas goodies and cookies.
Despite Elizabeth Barrett Browning's well-known judgment of Fuller as "one of the out and out Reds and scorners of grades of society," Adam-Max Tuchinsky finds that Fuller's socialist colors were not quite as true as we might assume (228).