score for (someone or something)

(redirected from scoring for)

score for (someone or something)

1. To gain or achieve a point or unit of points in a game or contest on behalf of a team. A noun or pronoun can be used between "score" and "for" to specify the kind or amount of points that was scored. This is only the second time she has scored for her team so far this season. The player scored three goals for Germany in the World Cup.
2. To write or arrange the music to be played by someone or something or as an accompaniment to something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "score" and "for" to specify the kind or amount of points that was scored. They scored the piece for an entire chamber orchestra. The composer really came to prominence after scoring for the latest entry in the series of beloved sci-fi epics.
3. To make straight cuts or incisions into the surface of something for some purpose. A noun or pronoun can be used between "score" and "for" to specify the kind or amount of points that was scored. You'll want to score the fat of the duck for easier rendering. A handy trick when tiling walls is to score the surface of the drywall for better adhesion with the grout.
See also: score

score something for something

 
1. to arrange music for one or more musical instruments; to arrange music for a particular type of voice or voices. The arranger scored the music for two pianos. The arranger scored the song for a four-part chorus.
2. to scratch something, such as glass, for breaking. Valerie scored the piece of glass for breaking and then snapped it off. The worker scored the pane of glass for snapping off.
See also: score
References in periodicals archive ?
A fielding error enabled Hudson to score, opening the scoring for the inning.
The match between Hyundai and Coke ended in a 1-1 draw with Hafeez scoring for Hyundai and Umer Mirza scoring for Coke.
This correlation is driving most personal lines carriers to use credit-based insurance scoring for underwriting and, in some cases, for rating personal lines accounts.
The worst-case scenario would be legislative or regulatory overreaction in the form of total bans on credit scoring for insurance purposes, Snyder said.
In 2001 and so far this year, several states have pursued a variety of approaches to control the use of insurance scoring for underwriting and rate setting: