score points

score points

To do something that receives a positive reaction or enhances one's reputation or standing with someone. I scored some points with my mother-in-law by offering to wash the dishes after the big meal. You're not going to score any points with the coach by showing up late to practice. Ben thinks he can score points with Leslie by donating to the fundraising campaign she's promoting.
See also: point, score

score points

COMMON
1. If someone scores points off you, they make themselves seem better or more intelligent than you in a discussion or argument. In the next session group members agreed to consider each other's contributions rather than use them to score points off each other. He has been trying hard not to appear as though he was using the situation to score political points. Note: You can refer to this type of behaviour as point-scoring. It is hard to see what an inquiry is going to achieve, other than some political point-scoring. Note: This expression is often used to show that someone is more interested in making an opponent look foolish than in saying or doing anything useful.
2. If you score points, you do something that impresses someone or makes them like you. These companies are hoping to score points with consumers and businesses by helping them to organize the information stored on their hard drives.
See also: point, score

score points (off)

deliberately make yourself appear superior to someone else by making clever remarks.
1986 Jack Batten Judges There's nothing condescending or cruel about his wit. He doesn't score points off the people in the prisoners' box. He doesn't take advantage.
See also: point, score

ˌscore a ˈpoint/ˈpoints (off/over/against somebody)

(especially British English) defeat somebody in an argument; deliberately say something that makes somebody appear stupid: Why don’t you try to solve the problem instead of scoring points over each other?I don’t like David. He’s always trying to score points off everybody. ▶ ˈpoint-scoring noun: political point-scoring
See also: point, score
References in periodicals archive ?
The 123racing product, which is based on a Pick 6 format, allows bettors to score points based on the placing of horses over six races, with the highest number of points winning, combines elements of real-money pari-mutuel pool betting with fantasy sports components for horseracing.
Max Verstappen has become the Max Verstappen has become the youngest driver to ever score points in youngest driver to ever score points in F1 aged just 17 years and 180 days.
Force India drivers feel it'll be tough to score points in home race
It makes me even more driven to help them score points, and no, I'm not thinking 'have I made the right decision?
30pm today if you want to score points from day one of the competition.
Georgi Barbarovski comments for Vreme that Athens' "extreme attitude" is a perfect chance for Macedonian authorities to score points in two fields--to show the western world the true intentions of its southern neighbor and to try and homogenize our society by remaining active in the process.
Capped 14 times by New Zealand and four times by Samoa, Meli has a true international He has the pace and power to finish off any attack - and even convert defence into attack - and is capable of utilising space to score points from all areas of the field.
The forth and final round continued to witness the decline in the level of performance for the Kalba team as they did very little to revitalise their performance or increase score points.
Throughout the qualifying heats they will be out to score points for factors such as speed of drift, line taken through a course, overall angle attained and driver panache.
The deadline for entering teams that will score points for the whole of February is 12:30pm on Saturday.
We are not going to score points going into the first corner," he said.
The team proved that it was as worthy as ever, that its offense could move the ball and score points, and that it wouldn't crumble in the face of adversity.
I spoke to Karl Rove and to other people around the president, and the reality was, my advocacy was not as compelling as the very strong poll numbers that showed, at least for the 2004 election cycle, that the use of the Federal Marriage Amendment as a political issue would score points in the states that mattered.
We recall that during the 2004 federal election campaign, Paul Martin attempted to score points by campaigning vigorously on the theme that the Conservative party was heavily populated with social conservatives.
Claire Deegan, Stephen Lindsay and Mark Holroyd fought off competition from around 300 fellow novices to score points for Newcastle, while orange belts Adam Walton and Chris Beale also managed to get through to the finals and score points.