scoop


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scoop the pool

To win all, most, or the most coveted of the available awards or rewards in some competition. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. The film scooped the pool at the awards ceremony last night, winning the three top prizes for Best Picture, Best Actor, and Best Actress. Among online retailers, the new company clearly scooped the pool this year, capturing an incredible 70% of the market.
See also: pool, scoop

scoop up

1. Literally, to gather or collect something with scooping motion or by using a cup-like utensil. A noun or pronoun can be used between "scoop" and "up." Scoop the muck up and throw it into the barrel over there. He scooped up the tadpole in his hands and brought it over for us to see.
2. To earn, achieve, or win something handily or easily. A noun or pronoun can be used between "scoop" and "up." The writer managed to scoop up seven awards last night. It's looking more and more likely that the team will scoop the championship up again this year.
See also: scoop, up

scoop the kitty

To win all, most, or the most coveted of the available awards or rewards in some competition. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. The film scooped the kitty at the awards ceremony last night, winning the three top prizes for Best Picture, Best Actor, and Best Actress. Among online retailers, the new company clearly scooped the kitty this year, capturing an incredible 70% of the market.
See also: kitty, scoop

scoop out

To remove something (out of something else) using a scoop or scooping motion. A noun or pronoun can be used between "scoop" and "out." I scooped the ice cream out of the tub and served it in a cone. The pathologist scooped out the victim's organs to try to determine a cause of death.
See also: out, scoop

scoop (something) out of (something else)

To remove something out of something else using a scoop or scooping motion. A noun or pronoun can be used between "scoop" and "out." I scooped the ice cream out of the tub and served it in a cone. The pathologist scooped the organs out of the victim's body to try to determine a cause of death.
See also: of, out, scoop

scoop something out of something

 and scoop something Out
to remove something from something by dipping or scooping. She scooped the water out of the bottom of the rowboat. Karen scooped out the water.
See also: of, out, scoop

scoop something up

to gather and remove something by scooping, dipping, or bailing. Karen scooped the nuts up and put them in a bag. Jill scooped up all the money she had won and left the poker table.
See also: scoop, up

What's the scoop?

Inf. What is the news?; What's new with you? Bob: Did you hear about Tom? Mary: No, what's the scoop? "Hi, you guys!" beamed John's little brother. "What's the scoop?"

scoop the pool (or the kitty)

be completely successful; gain everything.
In gambling games, the pool or kitty is the total amount of money that is staked.
See also: pool, scoop

scoop up

v.
1. To lift or collect something with a scoop or scooping motion: I scooped up a handful of jelly beans. The tractor scooped the dirt up and poured it in the hole.
2. To win or achieve something, especially a prize, easily: The movie scooped up numerous awards. We scooped another win up on Saturday.
See also: scoop, up

scoop

1. n. a news story gathered by a reporter before any other reporter hears of it. I got a great scoop! I was right there when it happened.
2. tv. to beat someone—such as another reporter—in the race to get a news story first. They scooped the other paper on both stories.
3. n. a general roundup and arrest of criminals; a bust. (Underworld.) Bart got picked up in that big drug scoop last month.
4. n. liquor; a glass of beer. A little scoop helps pass the time when you’re waiting.
5. n. a folded matchbook cover used to snort cocaine or heroin. I need a scoop. It’s no good without one.
6. tv. & in. to snort cocaine or heroin, using a folded matchbook cover. He scooped two lines together.

What’s the scoop?

interrog. What is the news? “Hi, you guys!” beamed John’s little brother. “What’s the scoop?”
References in periodicals archive ?
According to federal data, as of this June, just 155 of approximately 2,116 hauling machines and scoops working underground were equipped with such systems.
The overall acceptability of molded and scooped purees fell far below the ratings assigned to the participants' favourite food.
With this in mind, the Sound Scoop has been conceived.
The small scoop is marked in 50ml and in 2oz increments, the medium is marked in 100ml and in 3oz increments and the large scoop measures in 200ml and in 5oz increments.
The Mini Tractor features a working front scoop, while the Mini Dump Truck includes a tipping dump bed function, for transporting and dumping material.
Early versions were marrow spoons: they had a spoon-shaped bowl at one end and a narrow scoop at the other forming the handle with which to extract the marrow.
The sample, which measures no bigger than a crushed baby aspirin tablet and sieved to remove any large pieces of debris, was part of the third scoop of material collected from a sandy ridge of material near a location known as "Rock Nest" - a collection of dark rocks that the rover is currently parked next to.
After the instruments are judged to be clean, likely after the third scoop, the rover will begin to assess samples in the Chimra laboratory, its arm-mounted furnace, which will determine the chemical makeup of the martian soil.
HOUSTON (CyHAN)- This video clip shows the first Martian material collected by the scoop on the robotic arm of NASA's Mars Curiosity rover, being vibrated inside the scoop after it was lifted from the ground on Oct.
* Like quicksand, powdered-products frequently suck dispensing scoops down into the container's contents giving rise to the enduring, What happened to the scoop?" mystely.
To commemorate the occasion Srinivas Kumar, President & Chief Operating Officer, Baskin-Robbins International, Paul Reynish, Chief Marketing Officer, Baskin-Robbins International, and John Varghese, Managing Director of Baskin-Robbins Middle East, Europe, and South East Asia traveled to Singapore to take part in a special grand opening celebration with the country's master franchisee, Scoop & Scoop LLC.
Jeanette Oldham, who reports for the Sunday Mercury, won the title of Scoop of the Year for her investigation into asylum accommodation providers.
Hearing from Telyehenko about the challenges facing journalists in Ukraine, FUJ and IMS decided in January 2003 to create Scoop, an organization to support the efforts of investigative reporters in places like Ukraine, where internal support is limited or nonexistent.
A new online resource provides the "scoop" on dozens of works of art from the collection of the J.
"I wonder if I might scoop it out some before you make the sandwich." The Subway sandwich maker said, "I'll be glad to scoop it for you" and did a great job of scooping the bread as though it was a bagel.