scientist


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

it doesn't take a rocket scientist (to do something)

One doesn't have to be particularly intelligent to be able to do or understand something. I doesn't take a rocket scientist to learn how to change the oil in your car. How has he not learned how to check his email yet? It doesn't take a rocket scientist.
See also: rocket, scientist, take

you don't have to be a rocket scientist (to do something)

You don't have to be particularly intelligent to be able to do or understand something. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to learn how to change the oil in your car. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to know that you have to unplug electrical equipment before you try to fix it.
See also: have, rocket, scientist

you don’t have to be a ˈrocket scientist (to do something)

,

it doesn’t take a ˈrocket scientist (to do something)

used to emphasize that something is easy to understand: Of course this model sells more than the others — it’s the cheapest! It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to work that one out.
See also: have, rocket, scientist

rocket scientist, you don't have to be a

This problem or idea is not that difficult to understand. This hyperbolic colloquialism dates from the mid-twentieth century, as does its synonym, you don’t have to be a brain surgeon. Clearly they imply that these professions require unusual intellectual acumen. Reporting on an economic forum, the Boston Globe quoted former President Bill Clinton, “You want to save 4 million lives? Give them the medicine. It’s not rocket science” (Jan. 28, 2005). Also, “And then he got murdered. Doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure there’s a lot more to it than I thought” (David Baldacci, Hour Gam, 2004). See also no-brainer.
See also: have, rocket
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientist community congratulated the Chairman for this highly valuable achievement, which will not only be a source of inspiration for PARC young scientist in particular but also for scientist working in National Agricultural Research System of Pakistan in general.
The genetic codes will also help scientists pinpoint once-unrecognized species--for instance, members of a group of elephants in Africa may look identical to each other.
Almost immediately after landing, the scientists found dozens of new species, as well as species that had been considered "missing." They were surprised to see an orange-faced bird with strange wattles.
"I work with ship designers in order to make ship systems easier to use and better for the sailor," commented one recent participant in the Scientist to Sea program, "so stepping into their shoes for a while has improved my effectiveness as an engineer exponentially." Another scientist commented on the value of actually seeing equipment in situ, saying, "Now when I go back to work, I'll be able to recall the exact compartment where the equipment is located on the ship as opposed to just trying to imagine it."
* An entomologist is a scientist who studies insects.
Having personally benefited from direct experience in ecological science alongside practicing scientists, teachers are better situated to create authentic science experiences for their students.
No man is an island; what occurs between our politicians and our nations will also affect the discussions between our scientists and our scholars of religion.
He was fascinated by IBM's "optimization" work, in which scientists develop different business models and tweak them to make them most effective.
Increasingly, those scientists who study asteroid hazards say that a subtler, quieter, slower approach might be called for.
The animal model enables a scientist to understand what is happening at a level of detail that could not be reached in humans.
The student intermediary has the task of determining what can be maneuvered in the chemical world of one scientist and how it relates to the symbols in the other scientist's physical world.
Werner Kuhn (1899-1963), Swiss teacher and scientist, who among many other achievements in physical chemistry, first applied statistical considerations to the properties of macromolecules, and successfully accounted in this way for the elasticity and stress-induced double refraction of rubberlike materials.
Besides sending research articles to two or three anonymous reviewers, the journal was posting some papers on a Web site where any interested scientist could voice his or her opinions about the research, as long as the commenters revealed their identities.
He's the lead scientist with the Stardust project and a professor at the University of Washington in Seattle.
Full browser ?