References in classic literature ?
I don't mean to say it would be the case in all villages, but it certainly was so in this one: the village boys were full as manly and honest, and certainly purer, than those in a higher rank; and Tam got more harm from his equals in his first fortnight at a private school, where he went when he was nine years old, than he had from his village friends from the day he left Charity's apron-strings.
Great was the grief amongst the village school-boys when Tom drove off with the Squire, one August morning, to meet the coach on his way to school.
It was a fair average specimen, kept by a gentleman, with another gentleman as second master; but it was little enough of the real work they did--merely coming into school when lessons were prepared and all ready to be heard.
With huge labour he had, on the very evening of his arrival, managed to fill two sides of a sheet of letter-paper with assurances of his love for dear mamma, his happiness at school, and his resolves to do all she would wish.
The whole fifty boys started after dinner with one of the ushers for Hazeldown, which was distant some mile or so from the school.
It was a good, rough, dirty game, and of great use in counteracting the sneaking tendencies of the school.
But he was the great opponent of the tale-bearing habits of the school, and the open enemy of the ushers; and so worthy of all support.
Tom imbibed a fair amount of Latin and Greek at the school, but somehow, on the whole, it didn't suit him, or he it, and in the holidays he was constantly working the Squire to send him at once to a public school.
There are a lot of nice girls in school and we had scrumptious fun playing at dinnertime.
I guess Gilbert Blythe will be in school today," said Diana.
He told his mother--his MOTHER, mind you--that you were the smartest girl in school.
They were there three years and Gil didn't go to school hardly any until they came back.
Gilbert Blythe was trying to make Anne Shirley look at him and failing utterly, because Anne was at that moment totally oblivious not only to the very existence of Gilbert Blythe, but of every other scholar in Avonlea school itself.
She SHOULD look at him, that red-haired Shirley girl with the little pointed chin and the big eyes that weren't like the eyes of any other girl in Avonlea school.
It was asking too much of flesh and blood to expect her to tell before the whole school that she had been called "carrots.
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