schmaltzy


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schmaltzy

and shmaltzy (ˈʃmɑltsi)
mod. overly sweet and sentimental. (see also schmaltz.) This movie is too schmaltzy for me.
References in periodicals archive ?
And with Schmaltzy they find seams and score some nice give-and-go goals.
Overall, theirs was a joyful view of the work with no schmaltzy rhythm-bending and their matching song-like tonal beauty faithfully revealing Brahms' genius.
BAD POINTS: The female roles are awful, the script is unfunny and then too schmaltzy and the dialogue dire.
Yes, the fact that some posts are written under the nom-de-plum Tyler Durden, the fictional hero of Chuck Palahniuk's "Fight Club," is a bit schmaltzy, but the posts pack a punch (pun intended).
Its 2011 ad - replete with whining wannabes from The X Factor and schmaltzy scenes of an implausibly wholesome family Christmas - is too sweet to swallow for most.
Putting aside the disappointment with Aroma-scope, a new generation of children will love the gadgets and gizmos in this new film while parents will endure the more schmaltzy scenes thanks to Ricky Gervais's acerbic comments as the voice of Argonaut, the robotic dog.
While sniggering up our sleeves at how seriously the Americans take this schmaltzy show tune of an anthem, one can only admire the players' lyrical knowledge.
The film is as schmaltzy as they come, the acting rudimentary and the tunes far from Berlin's best but it's a tale of decency and loyalty and the comradeship of arms.
Schmaltzy father-daughter bonding sweetens the pill.
Schmaltzy father-daughter bonding sweetens the pill, sparking some lovely quick-fire banter between Costner and the luminous Carroll, who shows impressive emotional range.
In the Adagio, Belohlavek was heartfelt but never schmaltzy, and the finale emerged as powerfully measured yet full of Romantic feeling.
When you look at 29th Street there are those cheap clothing stores and schmaltzy flower shops," Roberts said.
Through the slightly schmaltzy porch, and up towards a giant panel, the light decreases, the golden panel amazes and close to it you take a sharp turn to the right and into the big barn.
Sure, it is too schmaltzy by today's standards, but its innocence is what I like, along with the idea that an average guy with a good heart can succeed when it appears that he is facing insurmountable odds.
Apart from The Merry Widow you don't hear much of the music of Franz Lehar (1870-1948) anymore, I suppose his brand of slightly schmaltzy romanticism has long since become pass6.