schlep


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schlepp

1. verb, slang To haul something, especially in an awkward or ungainly manner. From Yiddish. The apartment building I moved into didn't have an elevator, so I had to schlepp all my stuff up the stairs. My mom doesn't drive, so I bought her a rolling shopping cart so she doesn't have to schlepp her groceries from the store anymore.
2. noun, slang A tedious, arduous, or inconvenient journey. From Yiddish. If we're going to make the schlepp all the way across the country, then we might as well take the minivan. It's always been a bit of a schlepp between here and the center of town, but the new light rail system should hopefully make it a much easier commute.
3. noun, slang A foolish, bumbling, or incompetent person. From Yiddish. What a bunch of schlepps! First they get my order wrong, then they send it to the wrong address, and now they're trying to refund me the wrong amount of money! Jeff is managing the project? That schlepp couldn't manage his own sock drawer.

schlep

1. verb, slang To haul something, especially in an awkward or ungainly manner. From Yiddish. The apartment building I moved into didn't have an elevator, so I had to schlep all my stuff up the stairs. My mom doesn't drive, so I bought her a rolling shopping cart so she doesn't have to schlep her groceries from the store anymore.
2. noun, slang A tedious, arduous, or inconvenient journey. From Yiddish. If we're going to make the schlep all the way across the country, then we might as well take the minivan. It's always been a bit of a schlep between here and the center of town, but the new light rail system should hopefully make it a much easier commute.
3. noun, slang A foolish, bumbling, or incompetent person. From Yiddish. What a bunch of schleps! First they get my order wrong, then they send it to the wrong address, and now they're trying to refund me the wrong amount of money! Jeff is managing the project? That schlep couldn't manage his own sock drawer.

schlep

and shlep (ʃlɛp)
1. tv. to drag or carry someone or something. (From German schleppen via Yiddish.) Am I supposed to schlep this whole thing all the way back to the store?
2. n. a journey; a distance to travel or carry something. It takes about twenty minutes to make the schlep from here to there.
3. n. a stupid person; a bothersome person. (Literally, a drag.) Ask that shlep to wait in the hall until I am free. I’ll sneak out the back way.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Schlep Sisters, who co-produce the Menorah Horah as well as star in it, are funny women who take burlesque seriously.
Can someone go schlep him here for a tzenter, a 10th man?
Sources say it will schlep across Fifth to 535 Fifth Avenue for a piece of that retail pie.
In 2008, she thought up "The Great Schlep," desiring "Jews to gets their butts down to Florida" to inspire their grandparents to get out and vote for Barack Obama (and not be a douchnozzles).
I was at the Palace and I wanted to go to the bathroom, which was a big schlep along all these hallways and staircases," said Sharon, 59.
Pete, having the benefit of that enormous academic brain of his, always argues that as I'm not HIS mother, it's not HIS job to schlep off and buy petrol station flowers
High-profile industryites can't schlep around just any old suitcase--only the best will do for the world's glitziest film fest.
So the local neds won't even have to schlep round to their local supermarket to pick up their chosen weapons of mass disruption.
The growth of web shop-ping is proof of what a nightmare the weekly supermarket schlep can be, especially with children.
He must find money, visit the glass cutter, schlep heavy pane on foot through rain and wind, and install it himself.
Back in 2008, she urged young Jews to go down to Florida and convince their grandparents to vote for Obama, a trek she called "The Great Schlep.
But he, in contrast couldn't even be bothered to schlep down to the (London) X Factor studios to support his wife.
And I did schlep Adam through countless museums during our two European sabbaticals.