schlemihl

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schlemiel

slang A bumbling, inept, incompetent person; someone who always tends to fail or do things wrong. From Yiddish. What a bunch of schlemiels! First they get my order wrong, then they send it to the wrong address, and now they're trying to refund me the wrong amount of money! Jeff is managing the project? That schlemiel couldn't manage his own sock drawer.

schlemihl

slang A bumbling, inept, incompetent person; someone who always tends to fail or do things wrong. From Yiddish. What a bunch of schlemihls! First they get my order wrong, then they send it to the wrong address, and now they're trying to refund me the wrong amount of money! Jeff is managing the project? That schlemihl couldn't manage his own sock drawer.

schlemiel

and schlemihl and shlemiel (ʃləˈmil)
n. a gullible person; a loser. (From Hebrew Shelumiel via Yiddish.) See if you can get that schlemiel to buy the Brooklyn Bridge.

schlemihl

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Chamisso is best known for his story Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte (The Wondrous Story of Peter Schlemihl) (1814), which inspired, and is even referred to in, Andersen's "The Shadow", though Andersen makes clear there that the similarity is only superficial.
(14) Adelbert von Chamisso's 1814 tale Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte (English titles include Peter Schlemihl and The Shadowless Man) describes how a man sells his shadow and therefore his soul to the Devil.
Instead of selling his shadow to the devil like Peter Schlemihl in Chamisso's tale, Tom sold his body to someone seeking entry to the new virtual Japan.
Er grusste fluchtig das Denkmal des Schlemihl oder des Schlemihls Vater.
The reference to 'Schlemihl, oder Schlemihls Vater' has at least two connotations for the text.
(21) The reference to Tauroggen and the Prussian rebellion might well explain the significance of the references to Chamisso, who wrote Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte in August/September 1813, while living in Kunersdorf in Oderbruch, where he had retreated during the popular uprising against the Napoleonic occupying forces: a kind of 'inner emigration' that one might see as akin to Koeppen's own position.
One of the most gifted lyricists of the Berlin Romanticists and best remembered for the Faust-like fairy tale Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte (1814; Peter Schlemihl's Remarkable Story).
In 1814 Chamisso published the peculiar tale of Peter Schlemihl. The story of a man who sold his shadow to the devil, it allegorized Chamisso's own political fate as a man without a country.