scenery


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

chew the scenery

To be exaggeratedly or flamboyantly melodramatic or overly emotional while acting a role, as for television, theater, or film. I hated working with him on that play—every night he'd go out and chew the scenery so much that he was the only one the audience noticed! I love watching hammy actors chew the scenery in bad movies.
See also: chew, scenery

chew on the scenery

To be exaggeratedly or flamboyantly melodramatic or overly emotional while acting a role, as for television, theater, or film. I hated working with him on that play—every night he'd go out and chew on the scenery so much that he was the only one the audience noticed! I love watching hammy actors chew on the scenery in bad movies.
See also: chew, on, scenery

chew up the scenery

To be exaggeratedly or flamboyantly melodramatic or overly emotional while acting a role, as for television, theater, or film. I hated working with him on that play—every night he'd go out and chew up the scenery so much that he was the only one the audience noticed! I love watching hammy actors chew up the scenery in bad movies.
See also: chew, scenery, up

a change of scenery

A change in one's usual surroundings, perhaps precipitating a change in one's life. It is most often used when one is moving to a new place. I decided to move across the country for college because I really wanted a change of scenery after growing up in this small town. Heather's looking for a new job because, after 10 years at that company, she needs a change of scenery.
See also: change, of, scenery

change of scenery

a move to a different place, where the surroundings are different. I thought I would go to the country for a change of scenery. A change of scenery would help me relax and organize my life.
See also: change, of, scenery

chew the scenery

(of an actor) overact. informal
See also: chew, scenery
References in periodicals archive ?
We have four Vermont opera houses with their original scenery.
She's painted giant skies, done industrial-scale applique work and sewing and even made scenery with waterfalls pouring down it.
But company director Barry Gray, 36, from Chester-le-Street, couldn't see the scenery.
I felt fortunate to have the opportunity to visit a place so different from my own, so, phrasebook in hand, I went into the scenery as much as I could.
It just goes to show, if we have the cream of the A-listers drooling over our scenery, that not even Hollywood is a patch on the Emerald Isle.
He just lost his way a bit and the owners hoped that a change of scenery might help before they retire him.
Sky One will update it with computer-generated scenery and a brief to concentrate on gritty dialogue and plots.
See the wonderful Scottish scenery that was much loved by the late Queen Mother and celebrate her 100 Scottish years on this interest-packed four-day tour.
Director Joseph Giacobbe said the company received scenery and costume donations from companies like the Twin City Ballet of Monroe, the Tri Parish Ballet of Denham Springs, the Lafayette Ballet Theatre, and Ballet Mississippi of Jackson for this year's Nutcracker.
One of my favorite aspects of the book is the way Malfi uses the scenery of the hotel as a metaphor for the characters' situation.
The third updated edition of Dave Frary's HOW TO BUILD REALISTIC MODEL RAILROAD SCENERY (0890244707, $24.
Heavily burlesqued and closer in style to musical cabaret than straight theater, Kellam's ``Drums'' makes splendid use of lights, music and scenery.
The question of how to bring light inside while shutting out views inspired the architect to develop an abstract scenery within an enclosed manmade environment.
And that's what membership retreats like The Abaco Club offer chief executives looking for a change of scenery without the hassle of planning a family vacation, or the ritz, glitz and hubbub of yet another high-rise resort.
All his life, the artist "noticed"--not just the rising and setting sun from his home near the ocean at Prouts Neck, Maine, but everything around him: people; scenery of his hunting and fishing trips; wildlife, which he painted with passion; objects and details others would never imagine the subject of art; and the effect, movement, and inner life of these.