scene


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create a scene

To create a loud, typically angry disturbance or display in public, such that it draws attention to those involved. Robert created a scene in the store when they refused to refund him for the broken television. My parents always create a scene with their fighting wherever we go.
See also: create, scene

arrive (up)on the scene

1. To reach a destination, usually as something is happening there. When did the police arrive on the scene? By the time I arrived upon the scene, Kate and Jen were already arguing.
2. slang To come into existence or to be born. Funk music arrived on the scene in the 1960s. We are overjoyed to announced that our baby daughter arrived on the scene at 11:37 last night.
See also: arrive, scene

behind the scenes

Without being widely known or attracting attention. Referring to the private portion of a venue, operation, or production, as opposed to the public part. Let's have a round of applause for all the people who worked behind the scenes to give us such a great event! Sure, they seem happy together, but who knows what happens behind the scenes. I can't believe we're going to get a behind-the-scenes tour of the castle!
See also: behind, scene

burst (up)on the scene

1. To emerge or appear suddenly. As soon as the boys started shoving each other at recess, several teachers burst on the scene.
2. To suddenly gain fame, attention, or recognition. She's been acting for years, but she really burst on the scene after being nominated for an Academy Award.
See also: burst, scene

burst onto the scene

1. To emerge or appear suddenly. As soon as the boys started shoving each other at recess, several teachers burst onto the scene.
2. To suddenly gain fame, attention, or recognition. She's been acting for years, but now that she's been nominated for an Academy Award, she's really burst onto the scene.
See also: burst, scene

come on the scene

1. To reach a destination, usually as something is happening there. When did the police come on the scene? By the time I came on the scene, Kate and Jen were already arguing.
2. To become involved in a particular situation. Caitlin and I used to be best friends, until Liz came on the scene.
See also: come, on, scene

on the scene

At a destination, usually as something is happening there. When did the police arrive on the scene? By the time I arrived on the scene, Kate and Jen were already arguing.
See also: on, scene

set the scene

1. To describe something so that others can understand or envision it. Let me set the scene for you: I walked into the middle of an all-out food fight and was promptly hit with a plate of spaghetti. So I think I punished those students appropriately.
2. To be the catalyst for something that happens later. Their squabbling at Thanksgiving dinner set the scene for a total screaming match on Christmas. A positive conversation with the CEO today could set the scene for a promotion tomorrow.
See also: scene, set

set the scene for (something)

To be the catalyst for something that happens later. Their squabbling at Thanksgiving dinner set the scene for a total screaming match on Christmas. A positive conversation with the CEO today could set the scene for a promotion tomorrow.
See also: scene, set

arrive (up)on the scene (of something)

 and arrive at the scene (of something)
to reach the location of an event in progress. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on and at.) The police arrived on the scene of the crime. They arrived upon the scene of a frightening accident. What did they do when they arrived at the scene?
See also: arrive, on, scene

behind the scenes

without receiving credit or fame; out of public view. (Referring originally to those who worked on a theatrical piece but do not appear on the stage.) The people who worked behind the scenes are the real heroes of this project. I worked behind the scenes in the play. We should thank the people who are behind the scenes of our success.
See also: behind, scene

burst onto the scene

Fig. to appear suddenly in a location. When Charles burst onto the scene, no one was prepared for the news he brought. The police suddenly burst onto the scene and arrested everyone in the room.
See also: burst, scene

burst (up)on the scene

to appear suddenly somewhere; to enter or arrive suddenly some place. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) The police suddenly burst upon the scene. They burst on the scene and took control.
See also: burst, on, scene

come on the scene

 and arrive on the scene 
1. Lit. to arrive at a place. When we came on the scene, the ambulances were already there. The police arrived on the scene and began directing traffic.
2. Fig. to become part of a situation. She thought she was in love with Harry until Bob came on the scene.
See also: come, on, scene

make a scene

 and create a scene
Fig. to make a public display or disturbance. When John found a fly in his drink, he started to create a scene. Oh, John, please don't make a scene. Just forget about it.
See also: make, scene

make the scene

 
1. S/. to attend an event. We plan to make the scene, but we may be a bit late. I hope everybody can make the scene.
2. Sl. to understand a situation; to appreciate the situation. I can't quite make the scene, but it looks like Willie punched the guy over here. Then he moved to the window over here, and that's when the woman across the street saw him. I can make the scene. It's just like you said, except Willie came in and found the guy laid out on the floor.
See also: make, scene

on the scene

Fig. available or present where something is happening or where something has happened. The ambulance was on the scene almost immediately. I wasn't on the scene when it happened.
See also: on, scene

behind the scenes

In secret or private, away from public view, as in His struggle for the top position took place strictly behind the scenes. This term alludes to the various activities that go on behind the curtain in theaters, out of the audience's view. [Late 1700s] Also see behind closed doors.
See also: behind, scene

make a scene

Also, create a scene; make an uproar. Make a public disturbance or excited emotional display. For example, Joan made a scene when the restaurant lost her dinner reservation, or Ted made an uproar over losing his luggage. Make a scene was first recorded in 1831; the variant employs uproar in the sense of "a noisy commotion," a usage first recorded in 1548.
See also: make, scene

make the scene

Put in an appearance, take part in an event, as in I'll miss most of the party, but I hope to make the scene before midnight. This expression employs scene in the sense of "a place where an action occurs." [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: make, scene

on the scene, be

Also, arrive or come on the scene . Be or arrive where an action or event occurs, as in They won't have a wild party because their parents will be on the scene, or Once Bob arrives on the scene, you can expect fireworks. Alluding to the theatrical scene, where a drama is being played, this phrase has been used more loosely since the early 1700s.
See also: on

set the scene for

Also, set the stage for. Provide the underlying basis or background for, make likely or inevitable, as in Their fights about money set the scene for a divorce, or The comptroller's assessment of the firm's finances set the stage for a successful bond issue . These expressions allude to arranging a play's actors and properties on a theatrical stage. The first term dates from the late 1700s, the variant from the late 1800s.
See also: scene, set

on the scene

COMMON
1. If someone is on the scene, they are at a place where something is happening. By a piece of luck it was one of my own officers who was first on the scene. The lifeboat is due on the scene about now.
2. If someone is on the scene, they are involved in a situation. Before Alice had arrived on the scene we would go out regularly for the day or the weekend. Aunt Christina appeared on the scene then and looked after Ian and me.
See also: on, scene

set the scene

COMMON
1. If you set the scene, you briefly tell people what they need to know about a subject, so that they can understand what is going to happen next. I was writing an article and wanted to set the scene by giving a few details about how widespread the custom was. To visualize this period of his career it is first necessary to set the scene and describe the events leading up to World War 2. Note: You can also use the noun scene-setting. There's a certain amount of scene-setting in the initial chapter.
2. If something sets the scene for an event, it creates the conditions in which that event is likely to happen. Some members feared that Germany might raise its interest rates. That could have set the scene for a confrontation with the US, which is concerned that increases could cut demand for its exports. The first hour's cricket set the scene for a superbly entertaining day as England and South Africa played some of the best cricket ever seen.
See also: scene, set

behind the scenes

COMMON If someone does something behind the scenes, they do it in private or secretly, rather than publicly. Both countries have been working behind the scenes to try to free the hostages. The debate has been going on behind the scenes for months. Note: You can also use behind-the-scenes before a noun. The debate was postponed for a third time after another day of intensive behind-the-scenes negotiations. Note: This refers to the scenes or scenery used on the stage in the theatre, and was originally used to refer to those events in a play that took place off-stage.
See also: behind, scene

behind the scenes

in private; secretly.
This expression alludes to the area out of sight of the public at the back of a theatre stage.
See also: behind, scene

change of scene (or scenery)

a move to different surroundings.
See also: change, of, scene

not your scene

not something you are interested in. informal
See also: not, scene

set the scene

1 describe a place or situation in which something is about to happen. 2 create the conditions for a future event.
See also: scene, set

arrive/come on the ˈscene

arrive in/at a place, probably to change the existing situation: John and I were really happy together until she came on the scene.By the time the police arrived on the scene, it was too late.
See also: arrive, come, on, scene

create/make a ˈscene

complain noisily, behave badly, etc. especially in a public place: Please don’t create a scene in public.
See also: create, make, scene

(not) somebody’s ˈscene

(informal) (not) the kind of place, activity, etc. that somebody likes or feels comfortable with: The resort wasn’t really our scene. Most of the people were much older than us and there wasn’t any nightlife.I don’t like going to clubs. A quiet evening with friends is much more my scene.
See also: scene

set the ˈscene/ˈstage (for something)


1 give somebody the information they need in order to understand what comes next: The first few chapters of the book just set the scene.
2 create the conditions in which something can easily happen: His arrival set the scene for another argument.With so many economic and political problems, the stage was set for another war.
See also: scene, set, stage

behind the ˈscenes

(of discussions, arrangements, etc.) not seen by the public: The general public knows very little about what happens behind the scenes in politics.There was a lot of behind-the-scenes activity at the peace conference.
This expression refers to the parts of the stage in a theatre which the audience cannot see.
See also: behind, scene

heavy scene

n. a serious state of affairs; an emotionally charged situation. Man, that meeting was really a heavy scene.
See also: heavy, scene

make the scene

1. tv. to attend an event. (see also scene.) I hope everybody can make the scene.
2. tv. to understand a situation; to appreciate the situation. (see also make.) I can’t quite make the scene, but it looks like Sam punched the guy over here. Then he moved to the window over here, and that’s when the old dame across the street saw him.
See also: make, scene

scene

(sin)
1. n. a place; a setting. (see also make the scene.) I need a different scene. Life is too hectic here.
2. n. the drug-use environment; the drug scene. The longer you spend in a scene like this, the harder it is to sober up and go straight.
3. n. one’s preference. (see also bag.) This nine-to-five stuff just isn’t my scene. I quit.

make the scene

Slang
1. To put in an appearance: made the scene at the party.
2. To participate in a specified activity: made the drug scene.
See also: make, scene

behind the scenes

1. Backstage.
2. Out of public view; in secret.
See also: behind, scene

set the scene

/stage for
To provide the underlying basis for: saber rattling that set the stage for war.
See also: scene, set
References in classic literature ?
Most of the memorable events I have myself been exercised in; and, for the satisfaction of the public, will briefly relate the circumstances of my adventures, and scenes of life, from my first movement to this country until this day.
But, as the play proceeded, nothing roused them to any genuine expression of interest when Magdalen was absent from the scene.
At last the scene was over, and Fanny forced herself to add her praise to the compliments each was giving the other; and when again alone and able to recall the whole, she was inclined to believe their performance would, indeed, have such nature and feeling in it as must ensure their credit, and make it a very suffering exhibition to herself.
What could more plainly speak the gloomy workings of a mind not wholly dead to every sense of humanity, in its fearful review of past scenes of guilt?
The fact that it was retreating from the scene of battle lent colour to this hypothesis.
The veneration and the affection which some of these men felt for the scenes they were speaking of, heated their fancies and biased their judgment; but the pleasant falsities they wrote were full of honest sincerity, at any rate.
There was not even an instant's hesitation upon the part of the latter--it was as though he had not even paused in his swift progress through the trees, so lightning-like his survey and comprehension of the scene below him--so instantaneous his consequent action.
Avonlea is the dearest place in the world, but it isn't quite romantic enough for the scene of a story.
You acknowledge that you have not read the later scenes of the piece,' he said.
The next was a pretty little scene from the immortal story of "Babes in the Wood.
My lodgings were situated at a height of about 2000 feet; here the weather was cold and boisterous, with constant showers of rain; and every now and then the whole scene was veiled in thick clouds.
Little by little, probably, as time passed, this Easter scene was further enlarged, in part by additions from the closing incidents of the Savior's life.
The scene thus framed was so coloured and quaint, like a back scene in a play, that they forgot a moment the insignificant figure standing in the door.
When any extraordinary scene presents itself (as we trust will often be the case), we shall spare no pains nor paper to open it at large to our reader; but if whole years should pass without producing anything worthy his notice, we shall not be afraid of a chasm in our history; but shall hasten on to matters of consequence, and leave such periods of time totally unobserved.
I was often tempted, when all was at peace around me, and I the only unquiet thing that wandered restless in a scene so beautiful and heavenly--if I except some bat, or the frogs, whose harsh and interrupted croaking was heard only when I approached the shore--often, I say, I was tempted to plunge into the silent lake, that the waters might close over me and my calamities forever.