scarce

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(as) rare as hens' teeth

Incredibly scarce or rare; extremely difficult or impossible to find. Support for the president is as rare as hens' teeth in this part of the country.
See also: rare, teeth

be as scarce as hen's teeth

To be incredibly rare; to be extremely difficult or impossible to find. Support for the president is as scarce as hens' teeth in this part of the country.
See also: scarce, teeth

(as) scarce as hens' teeth

Incredibly scarce or rare; extremely difficult or impossible to find. Support for the candidate is as scarce as hens' teeth in this part of the country.
See also: scarce, teeth

make (oneself) scarce

To leave, hide, or make oneself less visible, typically to avoid something. Lisa's fuming about your text message, so you better make yourself scarce until she calms down. Why is it that when there are chores to do, the kids somehow know to make themselves scarce?
See also: make, scarce

good men are scarce

Few men are ideal romantic partners or workers. If he's got a great resume, then you better hire him—good men are scarce. All right, fine, set me up with your friend—I know good men are scarce.
See also: good, men, scarce

Good men are scarce.

 and A good man is hard to find.
Prov. Men who make good husbands or workers are rare. Larry is the best employee I've ever had, and I'll go to a good deal of effort to keep him, because good men are scarce. "I think you should marry John," Sue advised her daughter. "He's a good man, and a good man is hard to find."
See also: good, men, scarce

make oneself scarce

Fig. [for someone] to become difficult to find; [for someone to] go into hiding. Tom is mad and is looking for you. Better make yourself scarce. Make yourself scarce! Here comes the sheriff.
See also: make, scarce

*scarce as hen's teeth

 and scarcer than hen's teeth
Cliché scarce; seldom found. (*Also: as ~.) I do declare, decent people are as scarce as hen's teeth in these chaotic times. Handmade lace is scarcer than hen's teeth; most lace is made by machine.
See also: scarce, teeth

make oneself scarce

Depart quickly, go away, as in The children saw Mrs. Frost coming and made themselves scarce. This idiom applies scarce in the sense of "seldom seen" to removing one's presence. [c. 1800]
See also: make, scarce

scarce as hen's teeth

Also, scarcer than hen's teeth. Exceptionally rare, as in On a rainy night, taxis are as scarce as hen's teeth. Since hens have no teeth, this term in effect says that something is so scarce as to be nonexistent. [Mid-1800s]
See also: scarce, teeth

rare as hen's teeth

or

scarce as hen's teeth

OLD-FASHIONED
If something is as rare as hen's teeth or as scarce as hen's teeth, it is extremely rare. Record companies are becoming as rare as hen's teeth. Note: Hens do not have teeth.
See also: rare, teeth

rare (or scarce) as hen's teeth

extremely rare.
As hens do not possess teeth, the implication is that something is rare to the point of non-existence. The phrase was originally a US colloquialism, dating from the mid 19th century.
See also: rare, teeth

make yourself scarce

surreptitiously disappear; keep out of the way. informal
See also: make, scarce

(as) rare/scarce as hen’s ˈteeth

(old-fashioned) extremely rare: Critics always complain that good movies that the whole family can see together are as scarce as hen’s teeth.
This refers to the fact that hens do not have teeth.
See also: rare, scarce, teeth

ˌmake yourself ˈscarce

(informal) leave the place you are in in order to avoid an embarrassing or difficult situation: I could see they wanted to be alone, so I made myself scarce.
See also: make, scarce

make oneself scarce

tv. to leave; to be in a place less frequently; to be less in evidence. Here come the boys in blue. I’d better make myself scarce.
See also: make, scarce

make (oneself) scarce

Informal
1. To stay away; be absent or elusive.
2. To depart, especially quickly or furtively; abscond.
See also: make, scarce

scarce as hen's teeth

Singularly rare. Also put as scarcer than hen’s teeth, this allusion to nonexistent dentition is an Americanism of the nineteenth century. It appeared in James Gilmore’s My Southern Friends (1863): “Horses are scarcer than hen’s teeth around here.”
See also: scarce, teeth

scarce as hen's teeth

Nonexistent. Hens have no teeth, so what could possibly be scarcer? (Stones in their gizzards act as teeth to grind their food).
See also: scarce, teeth
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, a major objection to existing analyses of diminutive verbs was scarceness of data, so the goal of this research was to provide an inventory of diminutive verbs in Croatian based on the data obtained from the Croatian Derivational Verb Database (CroDeriV).
Improper planning and use of resources result in threatening scarceness in electricity, water and gas but effective measures are yet taken.
Although the parameter r can be directly used for testing the statistical significance of linear correlations, the limited nature of the tabulated critical values of r (e.g., Bevington and Robinson, 2003; Verma, 2005), for example, their scarceness for v > 100, should make the application of t test more appropriate and versatile.
Because General Land Office surveys were incomplete, a recorded presence of a tree species does not mean that unrecorded species were absent; rather, these are methodological absences due to scarceness in the surveys (Lobo et al., 2010).
Organ scarceness requires the development of effective and efficient procedures to select the most optimal organ receiver since the demand for organs might not be satisfied.
The failure in communication between patients and doctors, regarding herbal therapies, may be due to scarceness of scientific information available to the clinician-community regarding this subject, which hinders the doctor from discussing these options with the patient, who in turn, is discouraged from discussing alternate therapies.
Thesis 4 reveals that a general scarceness in supply of rare earths will not prevail until 2016, instead of that a mixture of oversupply and undersupply can be expected.
[...] The unusualness and the difficulty of instruction, the scarceness of books, the sudden relevance given to the intellectuals, gave them an unexpected distinction.
The scarceness of research focusing on HDRSC issues encouraged us to develop a suggested research agenda by using a two-stage expert-led approach.
Although Lessing acknowledges differences between the various disciplines and media, he insists on a common need of all effective languages of visuality: scarceness or minimalism.
Secondly, the cost of definitive, large cohort size RCTs is a major cause for their scarceness. Weinberger and colleagues discuss the obstacles, both scientific and operational issues, involved in properly designed RCT; they also examine the innate enormous financial burden of conducting large unisite or multisite RCTs.[sup.10]
It is important to recognize that the NCS program must always take into account the many constraints it faces, including scarceness of program resources, sensitivity to the burden faced by its voluntary respondents, and limitations on the extent to which respondents are able to retrieve accurate answers.
Because of the high prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the scarceness of specialized treatment units in the average community health care facility in Puerto Rico, patients arriving with a diagnosis of osteomyelitis present a special challenge in terms of disease management.
Normally decapsulation would follow electrical testing, but due to the scarceness of these units, it was not an option.
The scarceness of exposition, meanwhile, might create the impression that the viewer has simply stumbled onto a slice of life, but of course, this apparent randomness, and hence realness, is a cautiously crafted effect.