say (something) about (someone or something)

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say (something) about (someone or something)

1. To make some verbal comment regarding someone or something. Sarah's mother said some mean things about her new boyfriend after they left. I wanted to say a couple things about your report before you leave.
2. To reveal, demonstrate, or indicate some trait or aspect of someone or something. A: "Tommy's got a really bad temper, don't you think?" B: "Yes, though I think it says something about his parents, to be honest." The fact that they could have such a popular product and still manage to lose money says a lot about their competence as a company.
See also: say
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

say something about someone or something

 
1. to make remarks about someone or something. What did you say about me? I think that Fran must have said something about me to you.
2. to indicate or reveal something about someone or something. They all cheered. That really says something about Tom's popularity. The fact that almost no one came to his party says something about Walter, I think.
See also: say
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The students there have a sophistication that I think says something about what Richard and Amy are doing," says Greenberg.
You can meditate as long as you don't have a book that says something about right and wrong.
The entire sale, "says something about the acceptance of science as a cultural element, not just as something of practical value," adds Weart.
The title "Castelli in Aria: Arte a Napoli di Fine Millennio" (Castles in the air: Art in Naples at the end of the millennium), not only points to the somewhat surreal site of the museum, but says something about the intentions of its curators, who are evidently aware of how ambitious they are in putting on a show like this--one that tries to conjure visions.
The question itself defines a familiar conflict and says something about the discontinuity in our culture; the past is preserved but not made part of the future.
This lack of response to what I think is a reasonable question, says something about how far we've come, since 1960, from a belief in the principle of separation of church and state.
"It says something about how much we've learned about Earth and space characteristics," he says.