save your breath

save (one's) breath

To spare the effort of saying something, doing something, or making an appeal that will be futile. Save your breath, Tom. There's no way they'll agree to the deal. I was going to complain to the phone company about the extra charges, but I decided to save my breath.
See also: breath, save

save your breath

If you tell someone to save their breath, you mean that they should not bother saying something, because you will not agree to it or you do not want to hear it. `If you're going to tell me about the extra week you want to spend in New York, you can save your breath,' she said.
See also: breath, save

save your breath

not bother to say something because it is pointless.
See also: breath, save

save your ˈbreath

(spoken) do not waste your time speaking to somebody because they will not listen to your comments, advice, suggestions, etc: Save your breath. He never listens to anybody.This phrase comes from a longer saying: ‘save your breath to cool your porridge’.
See also: breath, save

save your breath

Don’t bother to tell me about it. The image of expending one’s breath to utter what no one wants to hear dates from the sixteenth century. In early English parlance it often was to keep one’s breath (or wind) to cool one’s pottage/porridge/broth (by blowing on it). Jonathan Swift (Polite Conversation, 1738) wrote, “Pray keep your breath to cool your porridge.” Today the food-cooling phrase is obsolete, but the first portion survives as a cliché. See also waste one's breath.
See also: breath, save
References in classic literature ?
"You'd better save your breath," Doctor Sarson advised him grimly.
"If you would speak to the Earl on such a subject, you insolent young puppy, you may save your breath," thundered an angry voice, and Simon de Montfort strode, scowling, into the room.
I don't hear a word, and you may as well save your breath to answer my question."
I know exactly what you want to say, so save your breath to cool your porridge.
Even wiping out, getting turned around under water, having to relax to save your breath, giving yourself over to the will of the ocean.
The Advertiser's Facebook readers have now responded to Mr Reid's comments, with Brian Cairney posting: "Truth be told, if it [the hospital] is built in Airdrie it will not serve the outer areas of Glasgow and beyond - so save your breath, it's Gartcosh."
save your breath. Norfolk's heard them all already, even from her own kids.
It is better to save your breath for where it's needed and right now it's in the third ODI.
And then you ran, Oggy Oggy Oggying at the first underpass, though you knew you should save your breath.
If the entertainment value is what would attract you to this title, save your breath and time, because the film offers next to no amusement and is just another hollywood flick that will be lost in the fray.
If you haven't already stopped investing your limited supply of office time in fruitless attempts to convince vaccine-hesitant parents to immunize their children, a small study at the University of North Carolina Women's Hospital in Chapel Hill might finally convince you it's time to save your breath for other more achievable goals.
If you haven't already stopped investing your limited supply of office time in fruitless attempts to convince vaccine-hesitant parents to immunize their children, a small study at North Carolina Women's Hospital in Chapel Hill might finally convince you it's time to save your breath for other more achievable goals.
I told him, 'you don't have to say thank you every time I bring a glass of water - please save your breath.'.
"Save your breath to cool your porridge"- London's mayor Boris Johnson, inviting a period of silence from Alex Salmond.