salt away, to

salt away

To put something into storage for use at a later date. An allusion to preserving foods, especially meats, by curing them with salt. A noun or pronoun can be used between "salt" and "away." Over the years I've taken to salting away lots of bottled water and nonperishable foods, in case of an emergency. You'd be wise to salt some of your paycheck away each month.
See also: away, salt
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

salt something away

 
1. Lit. to store and preserve a foodstuff by salting it. The farmer's wife salted a lot of fish and hams away for the winter. She salted away a lot of food.
2. Fig. to store something; to place something in reserve. I need to salt some money away for my retirement. I will salt away some money for emergencies.
See also: away, salt
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

salt away

Also, salt down. Keep in reserve, store, save, as in He salted away most of his earnings in a bank account. This idiom alludes to using salt as a food preservative. [Mid-1800s]
See also: away, salt
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

salt away

v.
To save or store something for future use: I salted away money from my summer job to pay for college. I bought 20 packs of paper towels that were on sale, and I salted them away.
See also: away, salt
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

salt away, to

To put aside funds for future use. Treating fish or meat with salt is an ancient way of preserving it, antedating modern refrigeration by centuries. In the nineteenth century the term, also put as to salt down, began to be used figuratively for saving money. “No one to hinder you from salting away as many millions as you can carry off!” wrote R. W. Chambers (Maids of Paradise, 1902). Also see save for a rainy day.
See also: salt
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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