sail into (one)

sail into (one)

To berate, upbraid, or chastise someone; to verbally attack someone. The boss really sailed into me about losing that account! The teacher, at her wits' end, sailed into the student when he made the rude noise.
See also: sail

sail into someone or something

 
1. to crash into someone or something with a boat or ship. The boat sailed into the dock, causing considerable damage. I was in my skiff when a larger boat sailed into me.
2. to crash into someone or something. The missile sailed into the soldiers, injuring a few. The car sailed into the lamppost.
See also: sail

sail into someone

Fig. to attack someone; to chastise someone. (Based on sail into someone or something.) The angry coach sailed into the players. The teacher sailed into Timmy for breaking the window.
See also: sail

sail into

Attack or criticize vigorously, as in It was part of his technique to sail into the sales force at the start of their end-of-the-year meeting . This term derives from sail in the sense of "move vigorously." [Mid-1800s]
See also: sail

sail into

v.
1. To move across the surface of water into some place. Used especially of a sailing vessel or its crew: The ship sailed into the harbor.
2. To move into some place smoothly or effortlessly: The student sailed into the room five minutes late.
3. To attack or criticize someone vigorously: The supervisor sailed into the workers for the shoddy job they were doing.
See also: sail

sail into someone

and light into someone
in. to beat or scold someone. Jimmy’s mother really sailed into him for breaking the window. The boss lit into his secretary for losing the contract.
See also: sail