sad

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a sad state (of affairs)

A particularly unfortunate, unpleasant, and/or upsetting situation or set of circumstances. Their company has been in a sad state after Jonathan took over. It's a sad state of affairs when you can no longer be sure how you're going to feed your children each night.
See also: sad, state

too (something) for words

So extremely (something) that it cannot be described in words. Marie, you are too kind for words. How can I ever thank you?
See also: word

sadder but wiser

Knowledgeable or experienced after having gone through something unpleasant or unfortunate. We came through the economic disaster sadder but wiser, hopefully better prepared for such disasters in the future. I left the dinner sadder but wiser, understanding just how entrenched her family's bigotry still is.
See also: but, sad, wiser

a (kind of) reflection on (someone or something)

That which presents a particular kind of opinion about or informs the reputation of someone or something. The staff you hire to serve customers are the best reflection on your restaurant as a whole. I feel like parents only want their children to behave in public because they know they'll be a poor reflection on them otherwise. The decay and ruin these landmarks are in is unfortunately a sad reflection on the economic state of our city.
See also: on, reflection

sad sack

1. noun A hopelessly inept, blundering person who can't do anything right. That poor sad sack Sarah has been stuck in the same dead-end role in this company for years.
2. noun A sad, moping person, especially one who refuses to try and improve their mood or situation. Don't be such a sad sack—I know you're disappointed about missing the concert, but that doesn't mean we can't have fun tonight! He just sat there like a sad sack, sulking in the corner of the party.
3. verb To be in a sad, moping mood, especially while refusing to try and improve one's mood or situation. Usually used in the continuous tense; sometimes hyphenated. If you don't quit sad sacking back there, I'm going to turn the car around and drive us all straight back home! Bill's been sad-sacking around the office ever since he got passed over for the promotion.
See also: sack, sad

a sad sight

Some instance or situation that arouses an intense feeling of sadness or pity. It was such a sad sight to behold, having to watch the child be taken from her mother like that. As I entered the clearing, I came upon the sad sight of a deer that had been caught in a bear trap.
See also: sad, sight

it is a poor heart that never rejoices

Even someone who tends to feel sad can find great joy, amusement, or delight in or about something. I'm sure this vacation will perk him up. It is a poor heart that never rejoices, after all.
See also: heart, never, poor, rejoice, that

it is a sad heart that never rejoices

Even someone who tends to feel sad can find great joy, amusement, or delight in or about something. I'm sure this vacation will perk him up. It is a sad heart that never rejoices, after all.
See also: heart, never, rejoice, sad, that

disappointed at someone or something

 and disappointed in someone or something
becoming sad because of someone or something. I am really disappointed at what you did. I am very disappointed in you. That was a terrible thing to do. They were disappointed in the outcome.
See also: disappointed

It is a poor heart that never rejoices.

 and It is a sad heart that never rejoices.
Prov. Even a habitually sad person cannot be sad all the time. (Sometimes used to indicate that a habitually sad person is happy about something.) Jill: I've never seen Sam smile before, but today, at his retirement party, he smiled. Jane: It is a poor heart that never rejoices.
See also: heart, never, poor, rejoice, that

sadder but wiser

Cliché unhappy but knowledgeable [about someone or something--after an unpleasant event]. After the accident, I was sadder but wiser, and would never make the same mistake again. We left the meeting sadder but wiser, knowing that we could not ever come to an agreement with Becky's aunt.
See also: but, sad, wiser

sorry sight

 and sad sight
a sight that one regrets seeing; someone or something that is unpleasant to look at. Well, aren't you a sorry sight! Go get cleaned up and put on some fresh clothes.
See also: sight, sorry

sadder but wiser

Unhappy but having learned from one's mistakes, as in Sadder but wiser, she's never going near poison ivy again. The pairing of these two adjectives was first recorded in Samuel Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798).
See also: but, sad, wiser

sad sack

A singularly inept person, as in Poor George is a hopeless sad sack. This term alludes to a cartoon character, Sad Sack, invented by George Baker in 1942 and representing a soldier in ill-fitting uniform who failed at whatever he tried to do. It was soon transferred to clumsily inept civilians.
See also: sack, sad

sad sack

an inept blundering person. informal, chiefly US
See also: sack, sad

a sad, poor, etc. reflection on something

a thing which damages somebody’s/something’s reputation: The increase in crime is a sad reflection on our society today.
See also: on, reflection, something

too funny, sad, etc. for ˈwords

extremely funny, sad, etc: The man in the post office was too stupid for words.
See also: word

sad

mod. poor; undesirable. This steak is really sad.

sad sack

n. a sad person; a listless or depressed person. Tom always looks like such a sad sack.
See also: sack, sad

sadder and/but wiser

Enlightened by an unfortunate experience; learning from one’s mistakes. The pairing of these two thoughts appears in the concluding stanza of Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” (1798): “He went like one that hath been stunned,/And is of sense forlorn:/A sadder and a wiser man,/He rose the morrow morn.”
See also: and, but, sad, wiser

sad sack, a

A pathetically inept individual. The term comes from a cartoon character named Sad Sack, invented by Sgt. George Baker and very popular during World War II. Baker’s representation of a limp-looking soldier in ill-fitting, loose-hanging uniform, who tried to do his best but was neither smart nor lucky and consequently failed at whatever he undertook, caught on, and the name was transferred to the inept in civilian life.
See also: sad

sad state of affairs, a

An unhappy condition, unfortunate circumstances. The use of state of affairs to describe events or circumstances originated as the more ambiguous state of things, which was first recorded in 1555. Affairs began to be used about two centuries later. R. L. Green played on it in The Land of Lord High Tiger: “Sad affairs of State! Sad state of affairs! Affairs of a sad state.” It is sometimes put as sorry state of affairs.
See also: of, sad, state
References in periodicals archive ?
'Our children's sadness or anger can control them.'
But when I put that last mark on the final page, it was tinged with sadness.
Barlow and her co-authors examined whether anger and sadness contributed to inflammation, an immune response by the body to perceived threats, such as infection or tissue damage.
Because the heaviness in my heart, the hostility of sunlight, and the fragile nature of my dreams let me know that all the sadness in the world has, on this random day, beaten me to my own soul.
To strengthen the protection of livestock herds in the NEA, where bovine sadness is more likely to manifest itself, researchers Monica Jacobsen, of the Institute of Veterinary Pathobiology, INTA-CONICET, and Silvina Wilkowsky, of the Institute of Agrobiotechnology and Molecular Biology, INTA- CONICET, work in different approaches for the development of recombinant vaccines for bovine babesiosis.
One of the key distinctions between sadness and depression is the time spent feeling sad or hopeless.
He has invented fictional characters that he calls 'Fasaeen (Arabic for 'tiny ones'), who along with various animals form the 'Very Scary Butterfly Gang' that is on a constant quest to steal sadness wherever it may be.
Yes there is the sadness of loss, sadness at losing someone you spent 26 years with, who gave birth to your children, and still sadness at times to see them carrying that loss.
'In sadness, I feel a sense of pride that my father passed away while serving the nation.
More importantly, the principle of "sadness counteracts anger" may have application value because the induction of sadness (e.g., passively watching a clip from a sad movie or listening to sad music) requires obviously fewer cognitive control resources mediated by the PFC and may regulate negative emotion; therefore, this principle could have some advantages in regulating emotion relative to cognitive-regulation strategies that may fail to work under stress.
The Positive Power of Sadness: How Good Grief Prevents and Cures Anxiety, Depression, and Anger
The 72-year-old said: "The sadness for me is that rock has reached a dead end.
AS HE SPOKE, I COULD SEE the sadness in Daniel Arzola's dark brown eyes.
And there will be no explanation that explains it away." Blending teachings from Buddhist, Jewish, and humanistic traditions, Michaelson ventures into the heart of sadness to reveal it as a powerful gate to healing and wholeness.
Wheather they are growls of anger, the laughter of happiness or cries of sadness, humans pay more attention when an emotion is expressed through vocalisations than we do when the same emotion is expressed in speech, Khaleej Times reported.