sad

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a sad state (of affairs)

A particularly unfortunate, unpleasant, and/or upsetting situation or set of circumstances. Their company has been in a sad state after Jonathan took over. It's a sad state of affairs when you can no longer be sure how you're going to feed your children each night.
See also: sad, state

too (something) for words

So extremely (something) that it cannot be described in words. Marie, you are too kind for words. How can I ever thank you?
See also: word

sadder but wiser

Knowledgeable or experienced after having gone through something unpleasant or unfortunate. We came through the economic disaster sadder but wiser, hopefully better prepared for such disasters in the future. I left the dinner sadder but wiser, understanding just how entrenched her family's bigotry still is.
See also: but, sad, wiser

disappointed at someone or something

 and disappointed in someone or something
becoming sad because of someone or something. I am really disappointed at what you did. I am very disappointed in you. That was a terrible thing to do. They were disappointed in the outcome.
See also: disappointed

It is a poor heart that never rejoices.

 and It is a sad heart that never rejoices.
Prov. Even a habitually sad person cannot be sad all the time. (Sometimes used to indicate that a habitually sad person is happy about something.) Jill: I've never seen Sam smile before, but today, at his retirement party, he smiled. Jane: It is a poor heart that never rejoices.
See also: heart, never, poor, rejoice, that

sadder but wiser

Cliché unhappy but knowledgeable [about someone or something--after an unpleasant event]. After the accident, I was sadder but wiser, and would never make the same mistake again. We left the meeting sadder but wiser, knowing that we could not ever come to an agreement with Becky's aunt.
See also: but, sad, wiser

sorry sight

 and sad sight
a sight that one regrets seeing; someone or something that is unpleasant to look at. Well, aren't you a sorry sight! Go get cleaned up and put on some fresh clothes.
See also: sight, sorry

sadder but wiser

Unhappy but having learned from one's mistakes, as in Sadder but wiser, she's never going near poison ivy again. The pairing of these two adjectives was first recorded in Samuel Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798).
See also: but, sad, wiser

sad sack

A singularly inept person, as in Poor George is a hopeless sad sack. This term alludes to a cartoon character, Sad Sack, invented by George Baker in 1942 and representing a soldier in ill-fitting uniform who failed at whatever he tried to do. It was soon transferred to clumsily inept civilians.
See also: sack, sad

sad sack

an inept blundering person. informal, chiefly US
See also: sack, sad

a sad, poor, etc. reflection on something

a thing which damages somebody’s/something’s reputation: The increase in crime is a sad reflection on our society today.
See also: on, reflection, something

too funny, sad, etc. for ˈwords

extremely funny, sad, etc: The man in the post office was too stupid for words.
See also: word

sad

mod. poor; undesirable. This steak is really sad.

sad sack

n. a sad person; a listless or depressed person. Tom always looks like such a sad sack.
See also: sack, sad
References in periodicals archive ?
When Sadness touches some of Riley's memories, they change from being happy memories to (slightly) sadder ones.
The results showed that participants who watched the sadness video clip were less accurate in identifying colors than participants who watched the amusing clip, but only for color patches that were on the blue-yellow axis.
Eruptions of sadness unnerve people (apparently about one in 10) to the point where they seek medication, most often from their primary care physician.
Aided by Riley's imaginary friend Bing Bong (Richard Kind), Joy and Sadness blaze a trail on the chugging train of thought back to Fear, Anger and Disgust, who have been left in charge of Headquarters, with disastrous consequences.
Sadness gradually takes control of Riley's thought processes about the changes she is going through.
Similar to Thompson and Balkwill (2006), their results also indicated that independent of language, vocal emotion recognition tended to be highest for anger (73%) and sadness (66%), and the lowest for disgust (42%).
The Minister for Africa said: "I wish to express my extreme sadness at the news of the aeroplane crash in Lagos, Nigeria.
There is sadness at the failure of a remarkable athlete and would-be Heisman Trophy candidate to take advantage of a rare second chance in life.
Looking at myself closing in from the sea I know harbors are sure but there's a sadness in them.
Perhaps I so quietly shifted into coping gear or planning gear that I missed the opportunity to explore or experience where the sadness could have taken me.
3 : causing feelings of sadness <a gloomy story>
John Bell, who is standing in for Clwyd South, told of his journey from the city's docks, and his sadness others cannot follow.
Why might a combination of sadness and self-focus lead people to spend more money?
He said: "It is with great regret and sadness that British Forces learnt of the death of a young woman and the injuries caused to three children.