sacrifice (someone or something) for (someone or something else)

(redirected from sacrificing for)

sacrifice (someone or something) for (someone or something else)

1. To give up, relinquish, or surrender someone or something in order to obtain someone or something, benefit someone or something, or achieve some purpose. I had to sacrifice my favorite three baseball cards to get my hands on the ultra-rare Mickey Mantle card Tom was carrying. He sacrificed a lot of opportunities for you, and this is how you repay him? I don't mind sacrificing a weekend for a chance to win a million dollars on TV.
2. To permit harm, death, destruction, or failure to someone or something in order to obtain something or for some purpose. Their government is clearly willing to sacrifice its citizens for this foolish war. Sarah sacrificed a lot of friendships and relationships for her place at the head of the company.
See also: for, sacrifice, something
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

sacrifice someone or something for someone or something

to forfeit someone or something for the sake of someone or something. Surely you won't sacrifice your dear wife for a silly twit like Francine! Would you sacrifice your bank account for a chance to go to Europe?
See also: for, sacrifice
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"All ordinary Filipinos have been sacrificing for a long period of time while the government officials are happy enjoying their loot and bonuses," Nest Reyes said.
Bong Sullano, in a lengthy Facebook comment said the public has long been sacrificing for lack of energy, inefficient transportation system, lack of infrastructures, unemployment, and corruption in government among others.
Halbertal distinguishes between the religious notion of "sacrificing to" and the generally secular notion of "sacrificing for".
In the second part of his book, which will likely be of interest to a broader audience than the first, Halbertal explores the notion of "sacrificing for" and the possible dangers involved in its application.
Although commitment has yet to be shown to influence sacrificing for trivial (i.e., low severity) conflicts, committed individuals indeed report greater willingness to sacrifice for severe transgressions than non-committed individuals (Powell & Van Vugt, 2003).