sacking

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sack out

To go to bed or to fall asleep. I'd been getting up so early all week long that I was ready to sack out by 11 on Friday night. Jonathan sacked out in the passenger seat, so I had to drive nearly the whole way in total silence.
See also: out, sack

sack up

1. To put or pack something into a sack or bag. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sack" and "up." My first job was sacking up people's groceries at the store down the road for $5 an hour. Don't worry about wrinkling the clothes. Just sack them up.
2. vulgar slang To start acting in a strong, confident, and/or courageous manner, especially after having previously failed to do so. In this usage, "sack" is slang for the scrotum, a reference to testicles, which are used figuratively to represent confidence, courage, bravado, etc. The phrase is not exclusively applied to males. Often used as an imperative. You need to sack up and ask your boss for a raise already! What's he going to do, fire you? Janet, I know you're nervous about asking Tom out on a date, but just sack up and give it a shot!
3. slang To have sexual relations with someone. In this usage, "sack" is slang for a bed. A: "I heard that Tom has been sacking up with some 30-year-old accountant from his old law firm." B: "Wow, he hasn't even been divorced a month!" I can't believe you and your ex-boyfriend sacked up again.
See also: sack, up

sack up with (one)

slang To have sexual relations with one. A: "I heard that Tom has been sacking up with some 30-year-old accountant from his old law firm." B: "Wow, he hasn't been divorced for longer than a month!" I can't believe you sacked up with your ex-boyfriend again.
See also: sack, up

sad sack

1. noun A hopelessly inept, blundering person who can't do anything right. That poor sad sack Sarah has been stuck in the same dead-end role in this company for years.
2. noun A sad, moping person, especially one who refuses to try and improve their mood or situation. Don't be such a sad sack—I know you're disappointed about missing the concert, but that doesn't mean we can't have fun tonight! He just sat there like a sad sack, sulking in the corner of the party.
3. verb To be in a sad, moping mood, especially while refusing to try and improve one's mood or situation. Usually used in the continuous tense; sometimes hyphenated. If you don't quit sad sacking back there, I'm going to turn the car around and drive us all straight back home! Bill's been sad-sacking around the office ever since he got passed over for the promotion.
See also: sack, sad
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

sack out

to go to bed or go to sleep. It's time for me to sack out. Let's sack out early tonight.
See also: out, sack

sack something up

to put something into bags or sacks. Please sack the groceries up and put them in the cart. I will sack up your groceries.
See also: sack, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sack out

Go to sleep, go to bed, as in We sacked out about midnight. This slangy idiom is a verbal use of the noun sack, slang for "bed" since about 1940; it alludes to a sleeping bag and appears in such similar phrases as in the sack, in bed, and sack time, bedtime.
See also: out, sack

sad sack

A singularly inept person, as in Poor George is a hopeless sad sack. This term alludes to a cartoon character, Sad Sack, invented by George Baker in 1942 and representing a soldier in ill-fitting uniform who failed at whatever he tried to do. It was soon transferred to clumsily inept civilians.
See also: sack, sad
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sad sack

an inept blundering person. informal, chiefly US
See also: sack, sad
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

sack out

v. Slang
To sleep or go to sleep: After a long day at work, I sacked out on the couch.
See also: out, sack
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sack up

verb
See nut up
See also: sack, up

sack out

in. to go to bed or go to sleep. (see also sacked out.) It’s time for me to sack out.
See also: out, sack

sad sack

n. a sad person; a listless or depressed person. Tom always looks like such a sad sack.
See also: sack, sad
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Azreen was referring to the sacking of 25 imams in Perlis on January 3, which also saw 10 others transferred via a letter dated December 31 last year, issued by the Perlis Islamic Religious and Malay Customs Council.
''If they have failed to perform that's their own problem, but sacking them because they supported Jubilee then that is wrong,'' he warned.
Sacking your manager DOES improves your team's form - at least in the short term.
The departure of Warnock at Palace seems to paint the picture and kick off the series for managerial sackings. Irving is set to follow after its axe day's foul right after the former Eagles box.
In the two leagues as a whole, this works out at 0.85 in the six games prior to the sacking, and 1.3 in the six games following the sacking.
FOOTBALL'S attitude to sacking managers is "arrogant" and the statistics on dismissals are "embarrassing", the League Managers' Association claimed.
On Friday, about 4,000 workers of various companies after finishing their first shift joined a rally to protest the sackings and handed a memorandum to the deputy commissioner of Gurgaon urging the state authorities to investigate the matter.
Summary: Defence Secretary Liam Fox has said he is "furious" over the sacking by email of 38 soldiers.
CONCERNS were growing today that electricity supplies could be threatened if power workers join the walkouts in protest at the sacking of hundreds of workers at an oil refinery.
On the contrary, the sackings undermine genuine cases of bullying and harassment."
Over the past 15 months, dozens of DVLA workers have been reprimanded, and sackings for gross misconduct have continued to be announced.
The sacking was revealed as a survey by law firm Klegal found there had been 137 internet-related sackings at 200 firms selected at random.
Dow says the sackings follow a review of 6,000 e-mail accounts conducted after a worker complained about offensive e-mail.
Coronation Street stars are braced for further sackings.
ENGLISH football is set for a record number of sackings in a season, according to figures from the League Managers' Association.