run the gamut

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Related to runs the gamut: runs the gauntlet, ran the gamut

run the gamut

To cover or extend across a wide and varied range. The tech company's products run the gamut from home appliances to computer modules for spacecraft.
See also: gamut, run
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run the gamut

to cover a wide range [from one thing to another]. She wants to buy the house, but her requests run the gamut from expensive new carpeting to completely new landscaping. His hobbies run the gamut from piano repair to portrait painting.
See also: gamut, run
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

run the gamut

Extend over an entire range, as in His music runs the gamut from rock to classical. This expression alludes to the medieval musical scale of Guido d'Arezzo, gamut being a contraction of gamma and ut, the lowest and highest notes respectively. [Mid-1800s]
See also: gamut, run
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

run the gamut

experience, display, or perform the complete range of something.
Gamut is a contraction of medieval Latin gamma ut, gamma being the lowest note in the medieval musical scale and ut the first of the six notes forming a hexachord. Together, therefore, they represent the full range of notes of which a voice or an instrument is capable.
1996 Europe: Rough Guide Russia's hotels run the gamut from opulent citadels run as joint-ventures with foreign firms to seedy pits inhabited by mobsters.
See also: gamut, run
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run the gamut, to

To extend over the entire range. The word gamut comes from Guido of Arezzo’s scale, a contraction of gamma, representing the lowest note of the medieval scale, G, and ut, the first note in any given scale (later called do). Acid-tongued Dorothy Parker was quoted as saying of actress Katharine Hepburn’s stage performance in The Lake (1933), “She runs the gamut of emotions from A to B”—that is, a very limited range of emotions.
See also: run, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
This commitment to health and safety runs the gamut from ensuring campers are well hydrated on hikes, to enforcing lights-out so that everyone gets adequate rest, to providing staff personal time to reduce the 24-hour-a-day-job stress.
Scudder's experience with the media runs the gamut from a 20-year television and radio career to his position as senior vice president at two major public relations corporations, Carl Byoir & Associates and Hill & Knowlton.
Yet it's difficult to define; it runs the gamut from Venuses reclining on bearskins to images so sick it's hard to imagine anyone could look at, let alone produce, them.
Except for the occasional minuet--equestrians say "dressage"--the horses are "acting out their proclivities," explains out technical director James Richardson, 21, whose job description runs the gamut from procuring between 1,500 and 2,500 tons of sand to overseeing all multimedia effects.
A 40-year industry veteran, Jones' real estate experience runs the gamut from his first job as a bricklayer in Local 34 to project manager at a large, national construction firm.
Each painting runs the gamut from pure geometrical abstraction to figuration to typography.
It runs the gamut animal rights, equal opportunity employment, world peace, low-income housing, community development and environmental issues--according to Kinder, Lydenberg, Domini & Co.
His expertise runs the gamut from commercial leasing and acquisitions to development, investment sales, and financing.
Fry, Grant, and Bell, in fact, kept shifting from the avant-garde pursuit of essences to the more relaxed, descriptive records of people and places; and their most memorable work may remain their abundant portraits, an intellectual Who's Who that runs the gamut from Lord Keynes to Edith Sitwell.