run its course

(redirected from running its course)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

run

1. verb, informal To leave or depart, especially very quickly or suddenly. Sorry, I've got to run. I'll call you tomorrow to go over the project in greater detail. A: "Do you want another drink?" B: "No, I'd better run. I have an early start tomorrow."
2. noun, slang A period of frequent and extended use of a particular drug; a drug binge. Usually used in combinations. It turns out he had been on a cocaine run for nearly three months straight, and he had spent almost all of their savings during that time. I nearly died on that last heroin run. This time, I'm doing whatever it takes to get clean.

run its course

To progress along something's natural course and conclude at its normal pace. (Used especially in reference to illness and disease.) Unfortunately, there's no treatment for this kind of infection. You just have to let it run its course. Don't stress about Susan's new boyfriend. I'm sure it's just a summer thing—it will run its course before she goes back to school. The president said he would rather let the economy run its course than try to manipulate it with a stimulus package.
See also: course, run
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run its course

[for something] to continue through its cycle of existence, especially a disease. Sorry. There is no medicine for it. It will just have to run its course.
See also: course, run
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

run its course

Proceed to its logical or natural conclusion, as in The doctor said the cold would probably run its course within a week. This idiom employs course in the sense of "an onward movement in a particular path." [Second half of 1500s]
See also: course, run
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

run its course

COMMON If something runs its course, it develops gradually and comes to a natural end. If you allow such behaviour to run its course without reacting, eventually the behaviour will disappear on its own. Is this a sign that the recession has run its course?
See also: course, run
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

run/take its ˈcourse

(of a series of events, an illness, etc.) develop in the natural or usual way without being changed or stopped: The doctors agreed to let the illness run its course, rather than prescribe drugs which had little chance of success.We must allow justice to take its course.
See also: course, run, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run

1. n. a session or period of time spent doing something; a period of time when something happens. The market had a good run today.
2. tv. to transport contraband, alcohol, or drugs. Harry the Horse used to run booze during prohibition.
3. n. an act of transporting contraband. Four soldiers were killed during a run.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

run

/take its course
To follow its natural progression or development: Should we let the illness run its course?
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

run its course, to

To continue to the end; until it runs out. The word course, the ground on which a race is run, was used figuratively for the continuous process of time, events, or an action from the sixteenth century on. “The yeare hath runne his course,” wrote Abraham Fleming (A Panoplie of Epistles, 1576).
See also: run, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also: