run the gauntlet of something/someone

run the gauntlet

To be exposed to or forced to endure a series of threats, dangers, criticism, or other problems. Refers to an old military punishment in which one was forced to run between two lines of soldiers while being thrashed with rods or whips. Medical students often feel that they have to run the gauntlet when they become residents in a hospital. The director has been running the gauntlet of fans' outrage following the release of his latest film.
See also: gauntlet, run

run the gauntlet of something/someone

COMMON If you run the gauntlet of a difficult situation, especially one in which many people insult, question or attack you, you experience it. Note: Gauntlets are long thick gloves which protect your hands, wrists, and forearms. He had to run the gauntlet of photographers and journalists outside the High Court. They ran the gauntlet of angry demonstrators. She left the court but not before she had run the gauntlet of threats and abuse. Note: `Gatlopp' is a Swedish word meaning `lane run'. The `gatlopp' was a Swedish military punishment that came into common use in England during the Thirty Years' War (1618-48). The victim had to run between two rows of soldiers who would whip or beat them. In England, the unfamiliar Swedish word `gatlopp' was replaced by the more familiar English word `gauntlet'.