run the gauntlet, to

run the gauntlet

To be exposed to or forced to endure a series of threats, dangers, criticism, or other problems. Refers to an old military punishment in which one was forced to run between two lines of soldiers while being thrashed with rods or whips. Medical students often feel that they have to run the gauntlet when they become residents in a hospital. The director has been running the gauntlet of fans' outrage following the release of his latest film.
See also: gauntlet, run

run the gauntlet

 
1. Lit. to race, as a punishment, between parallel lines of men who thrash one as one runs. The knight was forced to doff his clothes and run the gauntlet.
2. and run the gauntlet of something Fig. to endure a series of problems, threats, or criticism. After the play, the director found himself running the gauntlet of questions and doubts about his ability.
See also: gauntlet, run

run the gauntlet

Be exposed to danger, criticism, or other adversity, as in After he was misquoted in the interview, he knew he would have to run the gauntlet of his colleagues' anger . This term, dating from the first half of the 1600s, comes from the word gantlope, which itself comes from the Swedish word gatlopp, for "lane-course." It referred to a form of military punishment where a man ran between two rows of soldiers who struck him with sticks or knotted ropes. Almost as soon as gantlope appeared, it was replaced by gauntlet. The word was being used figuratively for other kinds of punishment by 1661, when Joseph Glanvill wrote, "To print, is to run the gantlet, and to expose oneself to the tongues strapado" ( The Vanity of Dogmatizing, or Confidence in Opinion).
See also: gauntlet, run

run the gauntlet

go through an intimidating or dangerous crowd, place, or experience in order to reach a goal.
This phrase alludes to the former military practice of punishing a wrongdoer by forcing him to run between two lines of men armed with sticks, who beat him as he passed. Gauntlet here has nothing to do with a glove, but is a version of an earlier word gantlope , itself taken from Swedish gatloppe , which meant ‘lane course’.
See also: gauntlet, run

run the ˈgauntlet

be attacked or criticized by many people at the same time: The Prime Minister’s car had to run the gauntlet of a large group of protesters outside the conference hall.This phrase refers to an old army punishment where a man was forced to run between two lines of soldiers hitting him.
See also: gauntlet, run

run the gauntlet, to

To be exposed to a course of danger, trying conditions, or criticism. The term originated in the seventeenth century, when the Germans adopted this military punishment from the Swedes. It consisted of stripping a man to the waist and making him run between two rows of soldiers, who struck him with sticks or knotted cords. The passage he ran was gatloppe in Swedish and gantloppe or gantlope in German. It was adopted as a civilian punishment in the American colonies and was spelled gantlet or gauntlet. “They have run the gauntlet of the years,” wrote Oliver Wendell Holmes (The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858).
See also: run