run the gamut, to

run the gamut

To cover or extend across a wide and varied range. The tech company's products run the gamut from home appliances to computer modules for spacecraft.
See also: gamut, run

run the gamut

to cover a wide range [from one thing to another]. She wants to buy the house, but her requests run the gamut from expensive new carpeting to completely new landscaping. His hobbies run the gamut from piano repair to portrait painting.
See also: gamut, run

run the gamut

Extend over an entire range, as in His music runs the gamut from rock to classical. This expression alludes to the medieval musical scale of Guido d'Arezzo, gamut being a contraction of gamma and ut, the lowest and highest notes respectively. [Mid-1800s]
See also: gamut, run

run the gamut

experience, display, or perform the complete range of something.
Gamut is a contraction of medieval Latin gamma ut, gamma being the lowest note in the medieval musical scale and ut the first of the six notes forming a hexachord. Together, therefore, they represent the full range of notes of which a voice or an instrument is capable.
1996 Europe: Rough Guide Russia's hotels run the gamut from opulent citadels run as joint-ventures with foreign firms to seedy pits inhabited by mobsters.
See also: gamut, run

run the gamut, to

To extend over the entire range. The word gamut comes from Guido of Arezzo’s scale, a contraction of gamma, representing the lowest note of the medieval scale, G, and ut, the first note in any given scale (later called do). Acid-tongued Dorothy Parker was quoted as saying of actress Katharine Hepburn’s stage performance in The Lake (1933), “She runs the gamut of emotions from A to B”—that is, a very limited range of emotions.
See also: run