run out (of something)

(redirected from run out of something)

run out

To leave for a brief period. Johnny, I have to run out and do a couple errands; will you be okay in the house by yourself? Will someone run out for some more hamburger buns?
See also: out, run

run out (of something)

To be depleted of something; to use or sell all of something that is available. We have to be sure we don't run out of gasoline before we make it to the next town. The shop ran out of bottled water and canned food after the government issued their warning about the storm.
See also: out, run

run out (on someone)

to depart and leave someone behind. My date ran out on me at the restaurant, and I had to pay the bill. Her boyfriend ran out when she needed him the most.
See also: out, run

run someone or something out of something

 and run someone or something out
to chase someone or something out of something or some place. The old man ran the kids out of his orchard. He ran out the kids.
See also: of, out, run

run something out of something

 and run something out
to drive or steer something out of something or some place. The cowboys ran the cattle out of the corral. They ran out the cattle.
See also: of, out, run

run out

1. Become used up or exhausted, as in Our supplies have run out. [Late 1600s]
2. Compel to leave; see run off, def. 5.
3. Become void, expire, as in Our renter's insurance ran out last month. [c. 1300] Also see run out of; run out on.
See also: out, run

run out of

Exhaust a supply or quantity of, as in We're about to run out of coffee and sugar. This expression, dating from about 1700, can be used both literally and figuratively. Thus run out of gas may mean one no longer has any fuel, but it has also acquired the figurative sense of exhausting a supply of energy, enthusiasm, or support, and hence causing some activity to come to a halt. For example, After running ten laps I ran out of gas and had to rest to catch my breath, or The economic recovery seems to have run out of gas. On the other hand, run out of steam, originally alluding to a steam engine, today is used only figuratively to indicate a depletion of energy of any kind.
See also: of, out, run

run out

v.
1. To hasten on foot to an exterior or distant place: Let's run out to the lake and swim.
2. To make a brief trip to fetch or buy something, especially by car: I'll run out for some more beer.
3. To be used until nothing remains: Our supplies finally ran out and we had nothing to eat.
4. To use something until there is none left: I think we've run out of toothpaste. Bring enough money so that you don't run out before your return.
5. To compel someone to leave by force or threat: The sheriff ran the gangsters out of town. We sneaked into the yard to get the ball, and a pair of vicious dogs ran us out.
6. To become void, especially through the passage of time: Our insurance policy will run out next week.
See also: out, run