run out of some place

run out of (something or some place)

1. To flee, exit, or depart from some place while running. People came running out of the burning building. I ran out of my office and jumped into a cab.
2. To be depleted of something; to use or sell all of something that is available. We better stop at the next exit to make sure we don't run out of gas. The store ran out of bottled water and canned food after the government issued the hurricane warning. I was going to make pancakes, but we ran out of milk.
3. To chase someone away with force or the threat of force or punishment. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "run" and "out." The sheriff ran the bandits out of town last winter, but it looks like they're back again. The security guard ran us out of the compound before we could make our way into the warehouse.
4. To operate a motor vehicle until it is depleted of fuel or oil. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "run" and "out." Tommy ran the gar out of gas driving it all around town last night. You've got to be sure you don't run your boat out of oil while you're still out on the water, or you could find yourself in serious trouble.
5. To drive a motor vehicle out of some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "run" and "out." I drove the boat out of the harbor at dawn and sped off for the fishing spot my brother recommended. Everyone knows a car loses half its value the moment you run it out of the dealer's lot.
See also: of, out, run

run out of some place

to leave a place quickly, on foot; to flee a place. He ran out of the room as fast as he could. We ran out of the building as soon as we felt the first signs of the earthquake.
See also: of, out, place, run