run out (on one)

run out

To leave for a brief period. Johnny, I have to run out and do a couple errands; will you be okay in the house by yourself? Will someone run out for some more hamburger buns?
See also: out, run

run out (on one)

To abandon a romantic relationship with someone. I don't know what I'll do if Sarah runs out on me. I thought Jack really loved me, but he ran out as soon as I wasn't earning as much money as I used to.
See also: out, run

run out (on someone)

to depart and leave someone behind. My date ran out on me at the restaurant, and I had to pay the bill. Her boyfriend ran out when she needed him the most.
See also: out, run

run out

1. Become used up or exhausted, as in Our supplies have run out. [Late 1600s]
2. Compel to leave; see run off, def. 5.
3. Become void, expire, as in Our renter's insurance ran out last month. [c. 1300] Also see run out of; run out on.
See also: out, run

run out on

Desert, abandon, as in He's run out on the family. [First half of 1900s]
See also: on, out, run

run out

v.
1. To hasten on foot to an exterior or distant place: Let's run out to the lake and swim.
2. To make a brief trip to fetch or buy something, especially by car: I'll run out for some more beer.
3. To be used until nothing remains: Our supplies finally ran out and we had nothing to eat.
4. To use something until there is none left: I think we've run out of toothpaste. Bring enough money so that you don't run out before your return.
5. To compel someone to leave by force or threat: The sheriff ran the gangsters out of town. We sneaked into the yard to get the ball, and a pair of vicious dogs ran us out.
6. To become void, especially through the passage of time: Our insurance policy will run out next week.
See also: out, run